Bell's palsy

(redirected from Bell's Paralysis)
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Bell's palsy

n.
A unilateral facial muscle paralysis of sudden onset, resulting from trauma, compression, or infection of the facial nerve and characterized by muscle weakness and a distorted facial expression.

[After Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), Scottish anatomist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bell's palsy

n
(Pathology) a usually temporary paralysis of the muscles of the face, normally on one side
[C19: named after Sir Charles Bell (1774–1842), British anatomist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bell's′ pal′sy


n.
suddenly occurring paralysis that distorts one side of the face, caused by a lesion of the facial nerve.
[1855–60; after Charles Bell (1774–1842), Scottish anatomist, who first described it]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Bell's palsy

n. parálisis de Bell, parálisis de un lado de la cara causada por una afección del nervio facial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The second element of the triad, peripheral facial nerve palsy, is seen in 30% to 90% of the patients with MRS that cannot be differentiated from Bell's paralysis; our patient also had experienced it about 20 years ago (10).