Belorussia


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Related to Belorussia: Byelorussia, Belorussians, Bielorussia

Be·lo·rus·sia

 (bĕl′ō-rŭsh′ə, byĕl′-) or Bye·lo·rus·sia (byĕl′ō-) Popularly known as White Russia.
1. A region of eastern Europe in present-day Belarus and Poland. Settled by Slavs in the 5th century, it became a part of the grand duchy of Lithuania in the 14th century, merged with Poland in 1569, and was annexed by Russia in the 18th century. In 1921 the western part of the region was ceded to Poland, and the eastern part became the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic, now Belarus.
2. See Belarus.

Belorussia

(ˌbjɛləʊˈrʌʃə; ˌbɛl-)
n
(Placename) a variant spelling of Belarus

Be•lo•rus•sia

(ˌbyɛl əˈrʌʃ ə, ˌbɛl ə-)

n.
a former name of Belarus. Also, Byelorussia. Former official name, Belorus′sian So′viet So′cialist Repub′lic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Belorussia - a landlocked republic in eastern EuropeBelorussia - a landlocked republic in eastern Europe; formerly a European soviet
CIS, Commonwealth of Independent States - an alliance made up of states that had been Soviet Socialist Republics in the Soviet Union prior to its dissolution in Dec 1991
capital of Belarus, Minsk - the capital of Belarus and of the Commonwealth of Independent States
Gomel, Homel, Homyel - industrial city of Belarus to the southeast of Minsk
Pinsk - a city of southwestern Belarus
Lubavitch - a town in Belarus that was the center of the Chabad movement for a brief period during the 19th century
Dnieper, Dnieper River - a river that rises in Russia near Smolensk and flowing south through Belarus and Ukraine to empty into the Black Sea
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Belorussian, Byelorussian, White Russian - a native or inhabitant of Byelorussia
Translations

Belorussia

[ˌbɛləʊˈrʌʃə ˌbjɛləʊˈrʌʃə ˌbɛləʊˈrʌʃə ˌbjɛləʊˈrʌʃə] nBiélorussie f
References in periodicals archive ?
The contract has been signed for the supply of the Wayne Helix dispensers for 2019-2020 in Russia, Belorussia, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.
Dover Fueling Solutions, a part of Dover that delivers advanced fuel dispensing equipment, electronic systems and payment, fleet systems, automatic tank gauging and wetstock management, is proud to announce that a contract has been signed with Gazprom Neft, a vertically integrated oil company, for the supply of the Wayne Helix(TM) dispensers for 2019-2020 in Russia, Belorussia, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.
Caption: Minna, or "Fanny," Weizmann (circled) sitting in the bottom row with her family in Pinsk, Belorussia, in 1904.
Ipravo will be the official representative of AFZ in Kazakhstan, Russia, Belorussia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Kirgizstan and Azerbaijan, it added.
Like many Ashkenazi Zionist leaders who 'returned' to Palestine, Nobel laureate Menachem Begin was born in Belorussia, then part of the Czarist empire.
1991: Leaders of the three republics - Russia, Belorussia and Ukraine - formed a commonwealth of independent states" and pronounced the Soviet Union dead.
1991: Leaders of the three republics - Russia, Belorussia and Ukraine - formed a "commonwealth of independent states" and pronounced the Soviet Union dead.
1991: Leaders of Russia, Belorussia and Ukraine formed a "commonwealth of independent states" and pronounced the Soviet Union dead.
Russia, Ukraine, Belorussia, Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan were part of Soviet Union at time of consolidation of revolution in 1922 while other republics mentioned below became part of USSR: Uzbekistan and Turkmania in 1924;Tajkistan in 1929; Kazkhstan and Kirghzia in 1936 and Estonia, Moldavia, Latvia and Lithuania in 1940.
I pity children taking Hekasi class today, because, compared to my childhood when Russia was simply USSR, students may be asked to enumerate the other Soviet republics, now independent countries, that existed from 1956 to 1991: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belorussia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kirghizia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldavia, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenia, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.
More specifically, as Russia expanded eastward into the Steppe and Siberia and later westward toward the Ukraine, Belorussia, and the Baltic, it was tolerant of difference for pragmatic if not ideological reasons.