gravitational lens

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gravitational lens
Abell 2218, a cluster of galaxies in the constellation Draco

gravitational lens

n.
A massive object, such as a star or galaxy, whose gravitational field bends light rays.

gravitational lens

n
(Astronomy) astronomy a lenslike effect in which light rays are bent when passing through the gravitational field of such massive objects as galaxies or black holes

gravita′tional lens′



n.
Astron. a celestial body, as a galaxy, whose gravitational field refracts the light of a more distant object.
[1945–50]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The lens uses a prism to bend light at a 90-degree angle, improving zoom.
The lens uses a prism to bend light at a 90-degree angle, enabling users to see farther.
These are substances with features measured in nanometres, or billionths of a metre, which let them bend light in unusual ways.
This effectively is an optical illusion and can only bend light up to 8 degrees.
Paper and ink bend light at a different degree, which helps the system in distinguishing between them.
These nanoparticles are able to bend light to a higher degree than water.
Eventually it was found slight amounts of other elements made glass denser, increasing its ability to bend light. However, increasing density also increased reflection.
As Christopher Crockett explores on Page 24, general relativity's requirement that gravity bend light has been a boon to astronomers seeking to see the most ancient stars and galaxies.
The researchers report that they have created a high-definition 3D holographic display up to 1 cm in size with a wide viewing angle of up to 52[degrees], based on a digital holographic screen composed of small pixels that bend light.
Another way to bend light around corners is to use mirrors, like in submarine periscopes, which also make use of reflection.
Both lenses and diffraction gratings bend light at different wavelengths to different extents, what scientists call "chromatic aberration," that can be overcome in conventional optics through use of a series of lenses that correct for that.
The ability of a surface to bend light is called refraction.