benediction

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ben·e·dic·tion

 (bĕn′ĭ-dĭk′shən)
n.
1. A blessing.
2. An invocation of divine blessing, usually at the end of a church service.
3. often Benediction Roman Catholic Church A short service consisting of prayers, the singing of a Eucharistic hymn, and the blessing of the congregation with the host.
4. An expression of good wishes.

[Middle English benediccioun, from Old French benedicion, from Latin benedictiō, benedictiōn-, from benedictus, past participle of benedīcere, to bless : bene, well; see deu- in Indo-European roots + dīcere, to speak; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ben′e·dic′tive, ben′e·dic′to·ry (-dĭk′tə-rē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

benediction

(ˌbɛnɪˈdɪkʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) an invocation of divine blessing, esp at the end of a Christian religious ceremony
2. (Roman Catholic Church) a Roman Catholic service in which the congregation is blessed with the sacrament
3. the state of being blessed
[C15: from Latin benedictio, from benedīcere to bless; see benedicite]
ˌbeneˈdictory adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ben•e•dic•tion

(ˌbɛn ɪˈdɪk ʃən)

n.
1. an utterance of good wishes.
2. the invocation of a blessing, esp. the short blessing closing a religious service.
3. (usu. cap.) a Roman or Anglo-Catholic service that includes a blessing of the congregation with the Host in the monstrance.
4. something that imparts a benefit.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin benedictiō]
ben•e•dic•to•ry (ˌbɛn ɪˈdɪk tə ri) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.benediction - the act of praying for divine protectionbenediction - the act of praying for divine protection
prayer, supplication - the act of communicating with a deity (especially as a petition or in adoration or contrition or thanksgiving); "the priest sank to his knees in prayer"
2.benediction - a ceremonial prayer invoking divine protectionbenediction - a ceremonial prayer invoking divine protection
orison, petition, prayer - reverent petition to a deity
benison - a spoken blessing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

benediction

noun
2. beatitude, favour, grace, felicity, exaltation, beatification, saintliness, holy joy She could only raise her hand in a gesture of benediction.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

benediction

noun
A short prayer said at meals:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
منْح البَرَكَه مِنَ
blahořečenípožehnání
velsignelse
blessun, blessunarbæn
palaiminimas
svētība
hayır duatakdis

benediction

[ˌbenɪˈdɪkʃən] Nbendición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

benediction

[ˌbɛnɪˈdɪkʃən] n
(= final prayer) → bénédiction f
(= blessing) → bénédiction m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

benediction

n
(= blessing)Segen m; (= act of blessing)Segnung f
(= consecration)Einsegnung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

benediction

[ˌbɛnɪˈdɪkʃn] nbenedizione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

benediction

(benəˈdikʃən) noun
a prayer giving blessing.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Deep love and fierce resentment burned in one flame within his breast, Anathemas struggled with benedictions. He felt as if one breath of his native air would renew his life, yet would have died rather than breathe the same air with rebels.
"King Charles II.," continued Athos, "left the Hague neither as a fugitive nor a conqueror, but as an absolute king, who, after a distant voyage from his kingdom, returns amidst universal benedictions."
They were side by side, the delicate hand of the woman curled in the hand of the man, which looked as if made to confer benedictions. His face bore out this impression--a beautiful-browed countenance, with large, benevolent gray eyes under a wealth of white hair that shone like spun glass.
Nigh unto thee, though thou professest to be the ungodliest one, I feel a hale and holy odour of long benedictions: I feel glad and grieved thereby.
"Tomorrow; If you ask me, I should say, the benediction today and the wedding tomorrow."
Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament; adversity is the blessing of the New; which carrieth the greater benediction, and the clearer revelation of God's favor.
The officiating priest was just finishing mass whilst D'Artagnan was looking at Bazin; he pronounced the words of the holy Sacrament and retired, giving the benediction, which was received by the kneeling communicants, to the astonishment of D'Artagnan, who recognized in the priest the coadjutor* himself, the famous Jean Francois Gondy, who at that time, having a presentiment of the part he was to play, was beginning to court popularity by almsgiving.
The priest and the negro knelt and murmured together the evening benediction and a prayer for the dead.
But a bird sang blithely on a budding bough, close by, the snowdrops blossomed freshly at the window, and the spring sunshine streamed in like a benediction over the placid face upon the pillow, a face so full of painless peace that those who loved it best smiled through their tears, and thanked God that Beth was well at last.
Returning to the Spouter-Inn from the Chapel, I found Queequeg there quite alone; he having left the Chapel before the benediction some time.
Bagration called to him, and Tushin, raising three fingers to his cap with a bashful and awkward gesture not at all like a military salute but like a priest's benediction, approached the general.
Anne and Leslie bowed as those receiving a benediction. Gilbert suddenly brushed his hand over his eyes; Owen Ford was rapt as one who can see visions.