Whorf

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Whorf

 (wôrf, hwôrf), Benjamin Lee 1897-1941.
American linguist who developed what came to be known as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in collaboration with his teacher Edward Sapir.

Whorf

(wɔːf)
n
(Biography) Benjamin Lee. 1897–1943, US linguist, who argued that human language determines perception. See also Sapir-Whorf hypothesis

Whorf

(ʰwɔrf, wɔrf)

n.
Benjamin Lee, 1897–1941, U.S. linguist.
References in periodicals archive ?
He also includes a detailed survey of modern scholars and their interpretations: Ann Moss, Richard Waswo, Erika Rummel, Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf.
Sapir's student, Benjamin Whorf, compared the Hopi language with Western European languages and concluded that their different structures reflected different world views and values: the Hopi place primacy on living in harmony with nature; in contrast, the Europeans valorize things and ways of marking time; hence, the preoccupation with "records, diaries, book-keeping, accounting .
According to the noted scholar Benjamin Whorf Language shapes thoughts and emotions, determining one's perception of reality.
Thus onwards to Ferdinand de Saussure and Benjamin Whorf.
A mesma secao inclui tambem um capitulo de Benjamin Whorf, "The relation of habitual thought and behavior to language".
22) Benjamin Whorf, "Science and linguistics," Technology Review 42:229-231 (1940).
Benjamin Whorf (1956), an American specialist on Indian languages, has stated that a language influences our thoughts.
To buttress this argument, the co-creator of the hypothesis, anthropologist Benjamin Whorf, noted that "after long and careful study," he had found that the language of the Hopi Indians, "contain no words, grammatical forms, constructions, or expressions that refer directly to what we call 'time.
Parte ella de los estudios llevados a cabo en el siglo xx que clasifica en dos periodos: el primero es el de los primeros intentos en el que se privilegio la explicacion de la diferencia entre la /t/ y la /tl/, representado por Edward Sapir, Walter Lehmann y Benjamin Whorf.
Aqui consid cero tres autores: Jean Piaget, Benjamin Whorf y Lev Vygotsky.
To some extent, this idea challenges the nearly 70-year-old argument of Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf, both Yale University anthropologists.