benzodiazepine

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ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

 (bĕn′zō-dī-ăz′ə-pēn′, -pĭn)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds with a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological effects, used as antianxiety agents, muscle relaxants, sedatives, hypnotics, and sometimes as anticonvulsants.

[benzo- + diazepine, seven-member ring containing two nitrogens (di- + az(o)- + (h)ep(ta)- + -ine).]

benzodiazepine

(ˌbɛnzəʊdaɪˈeɪzəˌpiːn)
n
(Pharmacology) any of a group of chemical compounds that are used as minor tranquillizers, such as diazepam (Valium) and chlordiazepoxide (Librium)
[C20: from benzo- + di-1 + aza- + ep- + -ine2]

ben•zo•di•az•e•pine

(ˌbɛn zoʊ daɪˈæz əˌpin, -ˈeɪ zə-)

n.
any of a family of minor tranquilizers that act against anxiety and convulsions.
[1930–35; benzo- + di-1 + az (o)- + -epine ((h)ep(ta)- + -ine 2)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.benzodiazepine - any of several similar lipophilic amines used as tranquilizers or sedatives or hypnotics or muscle relaxants; chronic use can lead to dependency
alprazolam, Xanax - an antianxiety agent (trade name Xanax) of the benzodiazepine class
chlordiazepoxide, Libritabs, Librium - a tranquilizer (trade names Librium and Libritabs) used in the treatment of alcoholism
diazepam, Valium - a tranquilizer (trade name Valium) used to relieve anxiety and relax muscles; acts by enhancing the inhibitory actions of the neurotransmitter GABA; can also be used as an anticonvulsant drug in cases of nerve agent poisoning
estazolam, ProSom - a frequently prescribed sleeping pill (trade name ProSom)
Ativan, lorazepam - tranquilizer (trade name Ativan) used to treat anxiety and tension and insomnia
midazolam, Versed - an injectable form of benzodiazepine (trade name Versed) useful for sedation and for reducing pain during uncomfortable medical procedures
antianxiety drug, anxiolytic, anxiolytic drug, minor tranquilizer, minor tranquilliser, minor tranquillizer - a tranquilizer used to relieve anxiety and reduce tension and irritability
muscle relaxant - a drug that reduces muscle contractility by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses or by decreasing the excitability of the motor end plate or by other actions
nitrazepam - a hypnotic and sedative drug of the benzodiazepine type
Restoril, temazepam - a frequently prescribed benzodiazepine (trade name Restoril); takes effect slowly and lasts long enough to help those people who wake up frequently during the night
Halcion, triazolam - a form of benzodiazepine (trade name Halcion) frequently prescribed as a sleeping pill; usually given to people who have trouble falling asleep
Translations

benzodiazepine

n benzodiazepina or benzodiacepina
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of benzo (a) pyrene on blood components, tumor markers, and oxidative status in mice.
Benzo (a) pyrene levels were exceeded the permissible limits in 15% and 55% of Tilapia and Mullet samples, respectively [8].
PAH standards contain 500 ppm fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benz[]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[]pyrsne, benzo [g,h,i]perylene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene.
They revealed that linear-type benzo [g]coumarins give similar substitution-induced property changes like parent coumarins, and the fluorescence property is suitable for bioimaging application over the others (very poor or no fluorescence from the benzo[f/h] coumarin in aqueous media).
The new citizen members are Ash Benzo, Maggie McGowan Davis, William "Bill" Law, Steven R.
About a year and a half ago, Camilo Benzo, CICP, manager of global credit and collections with gaming manufacturer IGT of Reno, NV, began noticing something different was happening in the way international banking relationships were working with customers overseas, in that they weren't working that well.
Numerous PAHs, including benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a] pyrene, benzo[b] fluoranthene, benzo [j] fluoranthene, benzo[k] fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenz [a,h] anthracene, and indeno [1,2,3-c,d] pyrene, were responsible for tumors in laboratory animals when they breathed these substances in the air (David, 1990).
As shown in Figure 1, 36 key PAHs are analyzed in just 32 minutes and all priority compounds--including benz [a] anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, triphenylene, cyclopenta[cd]pyrene, and benzo [b], [k], [j], and [a] fluoranthenes--are well resolved allowing accurate integration.