Boeotia

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Boe·o·tia

 (bē-ō′shə, -shē-ə)
An ancient region of Greece north of Attica and the Gulf of Corinth. The cities of the region formed the Boeotian League in the sixth century bc but were usually under the dominance of Thebes.

Boe·o′tian adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Boeotia

(bɪˈəʊʃɪə)
n
(Placename) a region of ancient Greece, northwest of Athens. It consisted of ten city-states, which formed the Boeotian League, led by Thebes: at its height in the 4th century bc. Modern Greek name: Voiotia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Boe•o•tia

(biˈoʊ ʃə)

n.
a district in ancient Greece, NW of Athens. Cap.: Thebes.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Boeotia - a district of ancient Greece to the northwest of Athens
battle of Plataea, Plataea - a defeat of the Persian army by the Greeks at Plataea in 479 BC
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Thebes - an ancient Greek city in Boeotia destroyed by Alexander the Great in 336 BC
Plataea - a former town in Boeotia; site of a battle between the Greeks and Persians in 479 BC
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Béotie
BeocijaBeotija
Boeotia
References in periodicals archive ?
For Pelipodas, on the eve of a battle against the Spartans, the tale of such a past outrage would animate his fellow Beotian patriots against the enemy.
(95) This self-reflection of science is a feature that escaped Husserl's attention when he considered that science, even at its highest level, is still operating within the limits of "natural attitude." Although a Beotian concerning this matter, I am inclined to think that one cannot even enter quantum physics without overstepping such limits.
The Beotian herd around us seems but little impressed as yet with the importance of the object you are engaged in carrying out but there is hope that as our numbers increase they may become more sensible of its value.