brachah

(redirected from Berakhah)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

brachah

(braˈxa) or

brocho

n
(Judaism) Judaism Hebrew terms usually translated as "blessing". See blessing4
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He refers to the gift as a "blessing," as if to say that it should be accepted in lieu of the berakhah which he had taken from Esau many years earlier.
We find it reemployed in Amsterdam by Hirtz Levi Rofe, for example, on Emek Berakhah (1729) by R.
This vital power, without which no living being can exist, the Israelites called berakhah, 'blessing.' Blessing is both internal and external--the inner power of the soul and the good fortune that produces that power" (op.
Huss, eds., Shefa Tal: Studies in Jewish Thought and Culture Presented to Berakhah Zak (Beer Sheba: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 2004), pp.
One evening, several days after she had met Elijah, she saw him again at Berakhah's home.
In this stage of Eucharistic development, the berakhah prayer of Judaism seems to have become a principal model of Eucharist.
The berakhah's two paradigmatic forms, one entirely in the third person and the other entirely in the second, were eventually combined to produce the hybrid that plagues us now"--that is, "Thou who creates." To avoid the grammatical mixture of persons, Hoffman proposes that the third person be dropped and the entire blessing formula transposed into the second person: "You are holy, God; You rule the universe." The verb that follows is then added as a participle: "who creates the fruit of the vine" becomes "creating the fruit of the vine." Thus, God is addressed only in the second person, "You are holy, God; You rule the universe, creating the fruit of the vine." (12)
The original Birkat ha-minim, whatever its text may have been, was never intended to throw Christians out of the synagogues--that door always remained open, even in Jerome's time--but it was a berakhah that served to strengthen the bonds of unity within the nation in a time of catastrophe by deterring all those who threatened it" (van der Horst, "Birkat Ha-Minim," 124 [emphasis added]).
A number of contemporary editions of the siddur have included the imahot, Sarah, Rebekah, Rachel, and Leah, in the first blessing of the amidah, as well as in such prayers as the mi sheberakh which have traditionally mentioned only the avot - the Patriarchs.(1) Justifications for such additions have been based on sensitivity to gender inclusiveness, as well as on historical precedents of liturgical flexibility, and on halakhic interpretations of the structure and requirements of the berakhah formula.(2) However, there has been less attention given to an exploration of the concept of the imahot in traditional Jewish sources.
These words have the same b-r-kh root: blessing (berakhah) and pool (berekhah), further connecting the mountain of springs to a place for blessings.
Perhaps it also brings with it recognition that, with Esau's marriage to a Hittite woman, only Jacob can be the bearer of the berakhah. Isaac gives it fully.
Jacob wants Esau to accept his gift as atonement for past wrongs and refers to it as a berakhah: But Jacob said, 'No, I pray you; if you would do me this favor, accept from me this gift; for to see your face is like seeing the face of God, and you have received me favorably.