brachah

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brachah

(braˈxa) or

brocho

n
(Judaism) Judaism Hebrew terms usually translated as "blessing". See blessing4
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References in periodicals archive ?
He refers to the gift as a "blessing," as if to say that it should be accepted in lieu of the berakhah which he had taken from Esau many years earlier.
We find it reemployed in Amsterdam by Hirtz Levi Rofe, for example, on Emek Berakhah (1729) by R.
This vital power, without which no living being can exist, the Israelites called berakhah, 'blessing.
Shefa Tal: Studies in Jewish Thought and Culture Presented to Berakhah Zak (Beer Sheba: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 2004), pp.
In this stage of Eucharistic development, the berakhah prayer of Judaism seems to have become a principal model of Eucharist.
Apparently, Berakhah had known him already for a number of years.
The original Birkat ha-minim, whatever its text may have been, was never intended to throw Christians out of the synagogues--that door always remained open, even in Jerome's time--but it was a berakhah that served to strengthen the bonds of unity within the nation in a time of catastrophe by deterring all those who threatened it" (van der Horst, "Birkat Ha-Minim," 124 [emphasis added]).
1) Justifications for such additions have been based on sensitivity to gender inclusiveness, as well as on historical precedents of liturgical flexibility, and on halakhic interpretations of the structure and requirements of the berakhah formula.
Perhaps it also brings with it recognition that, with Esau's marriage to a Hittite woman, only Jacob can be the bearer of the berakhah.
But, for example, Rav Henkin points out that the sheliah zibbur must say the berakhah "ga-al Yisrael" aloud "because the Sages established that the sheliah zibbur must pray aloud from [the berakhah] "Yozer" until the end of the Shemoneh Esrei "in order to fulfill the obligation of those who cannot [do so themselves].
In II Chronicles 20:26, there is a record of a major victory of King Jehoshaphat over an alliance of Moab and Ammon in a valley called Berakhah [blessing] to this day.
Indeed, it is the argument surrounding a berakhah that is said during the aliyot at women's prayer service that exposes a difficulty.