bergamasko

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bergamasko

(ˌbɜːɡəˈmæskəʊ) or

bergamask

n
an inhabitant of Bergamo
adj
of or relating to Bergamo
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Buratino is a son of three-time winning Kingmambo mare Bergamask, who finished third in the Listed Prix Petite Etoile at Deauville and hails from the extended family of Danehill Dancer.
Could Stephano Sartorelli, a displaced Bergamask begging the streets of Venice in 1545 (according to the Provveditori della Sanita archives), have had more in common with an English vagrant than he did with an Italian gentleman?
The awkwardness of the moment was comically rescued by the incompetence of Snug (Robert Goodale) who ended up dancing on the wrong side of the stage and facing the opposite direction to everyone else in the bergamask. It is Snug who has earlier confessed to being "slow of study" (1.2.63).
Chapter seven, "Zanni Texts, 1576-1588," will open up a world long hidden to most English-speaking scholars of Italian and theatre, since the opusculi here described are mostly written in dialect (chiefly Bergamask).
The text is extraordinary on many counts, for the naturalness of the language, particularly the urban Venetian of the four women, two ladies and two servants (the two male characters, a porter speaking Bergamask, and a young Lombard speaking Italian, are more conventional).
(I can see why this sensational stroke might be mentioned in a stage history, but not what it is doing in a note on the character's name.) In this production the play scene ended when 'masked armed guards forced the workers back from the departing court', as the note tells us, incongruously enough, to the stage direction 'Bottom and Flute dance a bergamask, then exeunt' (p.
Pandolfi sees a direct continuity from fool to zanni in Il mariazo a la fachinesca da ridere, an entertainment that may represent the birth of zanni (specifically, "la fachinesca"), whom we know as "Bergamask" workers with the same language and "silly parodies." As its title implies, Il mariazo offered a parody of a serious sermon on marriage and probably was recited as an intermezzo during a wedding feast to cheer the guests with fooling.