Belsen

(redirected from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp)
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Bel·sen

 (bĕl′zən) or Ber·gen-Bel·sen (bĕr′gən-)
A village of northern Germany north of Hanover. It was the site of a Nazi concentration camp during World War II.

Belsen

(ˈbɛlsən; German ˈbɛlzən)
n
(Placename) a village in NE Germany: with Bergen, the site of a Nazi concentration camp (1943–45)

Bel•sen

(ˈbɛl zən)

n.
locality in NW Germany: site of Nazi concentration camp (Bergen-Belsen) during World War II.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Belsen - a Nazi concentration camp for Jews created in northwestern Germany during World War IIBelsen - a Nazi concentration camp for Jews created in northwestern Germany during World War II
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2015 he spoke about how he "accidentally"visited the the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.
Anne herself died, probably from probably from typhus, in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945.
A German-born Holocaust survivor and author spoke with Mundelein High School students Monday about the terrors she faced as a 9-year-old prisoner inside the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.
In October or November 1944, Anne and her sister, Margot, were transferred to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp from Auschwitz, where they died a few months later, probably of typhus.
George Rodger (19 March 1908-24 July 1995) was a British photojournalist noted for his work in Africa and for photographing the mass deaths at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp at the end of the Second World War.
When Oberski was just four years old, he and his parents were deported to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where both of his parents died.
LIEUTENANT Colonel Leonard Berney had good claim to be the first British officer to enter Bergen-Belsen concentration camp at the end of World War II.
Anne Frank and her sister Margot were eventually transferred westwards to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where they died shortly before its liberation in April 1945.
Capt Brown, who was born in Leith, Edinburgh but later lived in Sussex, was at the liberation of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in northern Germany.
A French MP and a university lecturer have published the original Dutch version of The Diary of a Young Girl on their websites 70 years after she died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, aged 15.
Part of the film came from Benigni's own family history; before Roberto's birth, his father had survived three years of internment at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.