Bergsonism

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Berg·son·ism

 (bĕrg′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The philosophy of Henri Bergson.

Berg·so′ni·an (-sō′nē-ən) adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bergsonism

(ˈbɜːɡsəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophy of Henri Bergson, which emphasizes duration as the basic element of experience and asserts the existence of a life-giving force that permeates the entire natural order. Compare élan vital
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bergsonism

the philosophy of Henri Bergson, emphasizing time or duration as the central f act of experience and asserting the existence of the élan vital as an original life force governing all organic processes in a way that can be explained only by intuition, not by scientific analysis. — Bergsonian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Yet, its view on the elan vital and questions of morality allow an alternative Bergsonian reading of Mrs Dalloways's characters that may bring together the diachronic aspect of character construction and the unspoken political tensions in the novel.
The point made here by Deleuze is that an essential quality of the subject, its endurance in time or its being in duration (in duree, the marquee Bergsonian concept) is transferred through film to matter in perception, in the sense that matter is now perceived as responding to the same kind of organization at work in the subject's being, which is, like film, continuously organizing of discontinuous parts.
Most critics who associate Bergsonian thought closely with Faulkner do so by invoking the cultural milieu within which Faulkner came into his artistry, where the thinking of Bergson helped shape intellectual debate in the United States even more than in Europe.
The time of philosophy is that of Bergsonian duree [duration], wherein time is not constructed as a linear succession of separate moments, but as a continuous flow of temporality, where every past is contained within the present and thus every moment has its place.
Ellis questions whether this is a truly comic beffa or a confidence trick with criminal intent, but eventually he decides this is a bawdy morality tale about the prudish wife, who is brought in line with her society's looser values through corrective laughter--an example of thoroughly Bergsonian reasoning, he notes.
Bowers' Hazlitt is a creature of unease, an unease ultimately translating into a theory of comedy that holds that, in Hazlitt's words, "the ludicrous prevails over the pathetic, and we receive pleasure instead of pain from the farce of life which is played before us." Along the way enlisting Bergsonian theory, Frye's taxonomy, and Bakhtinian polysemy, Bowers challenges received notions about Hazlitt's thinking on disinterestedness--or, rather, qualifies its "romantic" or sentimental basis to argue for a Hazlitt for whom sympathetic accommodation is only the beginning of a process finally issuing in--to quote Hazlitt on Jonson--"directness of understanding."
From this place of duration, this place of depth, we can experience Bergsonian "intuition." Intuition is this contact with our own inner selves.
This essay addresses Bergson's underemphasized historical connection with Spain and explores Unamuno's explicit and implicit incorporation of Bergsonian ideas.
Duration became the unconscious paradigm tbr the cosmos in later parts of the Bergsonian oeuvre and Bergson was the only philosopher to give us some basis for responding to a simple but embarrassing question that teachers and professors encounter when asked, "where do souls come from?"
(28) Bergsonian social welfare functions are defined in terms of the ethics of specific individuals, who judge the weights assigned each person's utility score.