Berkeleian

Berke·le·ian·ism

 (bärk′lē-ə-nĭz′əm, bûr′-)
n.
George Berkeley's philosophy of subjective idealism, which holds that material objects have no independent being but exist only as concepts in God's mind and as perceptions of those concepts in other minds.

Berke′le·ian adj. & n.

Berkeleian

(bɑːˈklɪən)
adj
(Philosophy) denoting or relating to the philosophy of George Berkeley
n
(Philosophy) a follower of his teachings
References in classic literature ?
But the Berkeleian way of meeting this difficulty is so familiar that I need not enlarge upon it now.
If Berkeleian immaterialism results from eliminating the material side of Descartes' dualism, a materialist approach to the mind results from eliminating the immaterial side.
10) Alston has pointed out that explanatory arguments of this kind suffer from two serious difficulties: "(a) No one has ever succeeded in making a plausible case for the superiority of this "standard" explanation to its alternatives, like the self-generation of sensory experiences or their direct production by a Cartesian demon or Berkeleian God.
That is meant broadly, and I think that Mander would agree: the value of Norris' thought is not simply for the relief into which it throws the canonical philosophies of Lockean empiricism, Berkeleian idealism, or English Newtonism; just as important is what it reveals about Platonic and Augustinian traditions late seventeenth-century British philosophy.
It is as if civilization, with its potential for order and symmetry, were immanent in the wilderness, waiting for the Berkeleian human mind to know and thus create it.
His framework of thought is embedded in its context of contemporary philosophical ideas on subjectivity and perception--a Humean stance on the relations between the world, reason, and the human subject, and a Berkeleian perspective on vision.
137), and that Nietzsche was a Berkeleian, because his rejection of any notion of a thing-in-itself was really a rejection of any mind-independent object; however, he claims, Nietzsche was likewise committed to panpsychism and thus to the idea that objects are never unobserved, never mind-independent.
Coleridge considered himself a Berkeleian (110), yet elsewhere in Coleridge criticism we find more convincing denials: J.
the Berkeleian perception of Mouth by Auditor is a more significant Irish influence on the play than the remembered voices of aged Irish women.
15) Even the earlier version of the poem advertises its relations with debates about the mind, specifically by means of the footnote that reads, "You remember, I am a Berkeleian.
12) his prose reads like a list ("so taking my Gun, a Hatchet, and my Dog, and a larger Quantity of Powder and Shot than usual, with two Bisket Cakes, and a great Bunch of Raisins" [7:124]); his adventures link into a Berkeleian "Chain of Wonders" (8:68), "every Part, in its order" (7:8); he tolls casualties (2:25); every few pages he recites some or other inventory.
Hazlitt's admiration for Berkeley is expressed in a number of contexts, and acts as a pointer to the strong presence of the Berkeleian philosophy in the development of his critical theory.