Berkeleianism

Berke·le·ian·ism

 (bärk′lē-ə-nĭz′əm, bûr′-)
n.
George Berkeley's philosophy of subjective idealism, which holds that material objects have no independent being but exist only as concepts in God's mind and as perceptions of those concepts in other minds.

Berke′le·ian adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Berkeleianism

(bɑːˈklɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical system of George Berkeley, holding that objects exist only when perceived, that God's perception sustains the universe, and that there is no independent substratum or substance in which these perceptions inhere
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Berkeleianism

the philosophy and beliefs of George Berkeley denying the existence of the real world. — Berkeleian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
the system of philosophical idealism developed by George Berkeley (1685?-1753), especially his tenet that the physical world does not have an independent reality but exists as a perception of the divine mind and the flnite mind of man. Also Berkeleyism.Berkeleian, Berkeleyan, n., adj.
See also: Perception
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Barth, for example, claims that we do not "have to resort to a Berkeleian philosophy" to find the source of Coleridge's belief in a God who actively sustains creation (Symbolic 20), while Seamus Perry argues that "his Berkeleianism is impure," because, "Even at his most rampantly idealist, he didn't deny that real existence of other things" (34).
Further, Berkeleianism not only refuses a means to encounter God, but also to encounter other human beings.