Bermuda

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Ber·mu·da

 (bər-myo͞o′də)
A self-governing British colony comprising about 300 coral islands in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of Cape Hatteras. The first settlement was made in 1609 by British colonists shipwrecked on their way to Virginia. Tourism and international finance are crucial to its economy. Hamilton, on Bermuda Island, the largest in the archipelago, is the capital.

Ber·mu′di·an, Ber·mu′dan adj. & n.

Bermuda

(bəˈmjuːdə)
n
(Placename) a UK Overseas Territory consisting of a group of over 150 coral islands (the Bermudas) in the NW Atlantic: discovered in about 1503, colonized by the British by 1612, although not acquired by the British crown until 1684. Capital: Hamilton. Pop: 69 467 (2013 est). Area: 53 sq km (20 sq miles)

Ber•mu•da

(bərˈmyu də)

n.
a group of islands in the Atlantic, 580 mi. (935 km) E of North Carolina: a British colony; resort. 62,569; 20 sq. mi. (53 sq. km). Cap.: Hamilton.
Ber•mu′dan, Ber•mu′di•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bermuda - a group of islands in the Atlantic off the Carolina coastBermuda - a group of islands in the Atlantic off the Carolina coast; British colony; a popular resort
Atlantic, Atlantic Ocean - the 2nd largest ocean; separates North and South America on the west from Europe and Africa on the east
Bermudan, Bermudian - a native or inhabitant of Bermuda
Translations

Bermuda

[bɜːˈmjuːdə]
A. Nlas Bermudas
B. CPD Bermuda shorts NPLbermudas fpl
the Bermuda Triangle Nel triángulo de las Bermudas

Bermuda

[bərˈmjuːdə] nles Bermudes fplBermuda shorts nplbermuda m

Bermuda

nBermuda nt (form rare); the Bermudasdie Bermudas pl, → die Bermudainseln pl; to go to Bermudaauf die Bermudas fahren

Bermuda

[bɜːˈmjuːdə] n the Bermudasle Bermude
References in classic literature ?
A call will be made at Bermuda, which lies directly in this route homeward, and will be reached in about ten days from Madeira, and after spending a short time with our friends the Bermudians, the final departure will be made for home, which will be reached in about three days.
The public sector, the largest employer of Bermudians has cut its workforce by 12% since 2010.
Her evidence suggests that Bermudians were always willing to consider people of color Christians--even when their race clearly put them in a lower social class--whereas New Englanders developed an increasingly narrow view of whom should be counted among the faithful.
Quakers, Catholics, Algonquians, and Bermudians of color, in various ways, offered "bodily performances [that] created alternate spaces that cut across English puritan definitions of the body of Christ and the body politic" (125).
At this time of year, what we Bermudians call "Sargasso weed"--from the Sargasso Sea's enormous drift of free-floating sargassum--covers the whole beach.
In the Eye of All Trade: Bermuda, Bermudians, and the Maritime Atlantic World, 1680-1783.
I would expect to see many Bermudians showing their face at our games this season, and hopefully we can put smiles on their faces.
Across seven substantive chapters, plus an introduction, a conclusion, and an epilogue, Jarvis explores the lives of Bermudians.
It's not that Bermudians like taxes; it's just that Bermuda these days is in the business of trying to disprove the saw that two wrongs don't make a right.
efforts to prepare Bermudians and others for the upcoming changes.
The seawater is warm all year round, although spoilt Bermudians won't even dip a toe in until May.
The prolific Butler is an educator who also runs The Writer's Machine, a publishing company that specializes in books by and about Bermudians, since 1976.