Du Guesclin

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Du Guesclin

(French dy ɡeklɛ̃)
n
(Biography) Bertrand (bɛrtrɑ̃). ?1320–80, French military leader; as constable of France (1370–80), he helped to drive the English from France
References in periodicals archive ?
7) Huizinga informa ademas que el poeta frances Eustache Deschamps (1340-1406), creador de las Nueve heroinas, trastoco el motivo incorporando un decimo caballero, Bertrand du Guesclin, heroe militar frances responsable de la recuperacion de Crecy y Poitiers en la Guerra de los Cien anos contra Inglaterra.
The Flower of Chivalry: Bertrand du Guesclin and the Hundred Years War.
For all of the grandeur of Jean Froissart's chronicles or the lives of Bertrand du Guesclin and the Black Prince, written by Cuvelier and Chandos Herald, respectively, this "historical narcissism" increasingly did not reflect the reality of war (726).
who wrote The flower of chivalry; Bertrand du Guesclin and the Hundred years war, presents a page- turner that recounts the life and exploits of the dastardly Count of Foix, who ruled in Bearn, on the border of Spain, at the time of the Hundred Years War, the war against the Cathars, and the Investiture Controversy, all of which affected the Count in greater or lesser ways.
Maureen Bolton provides a bibliographical description of two French manuscripts containing the 'chivalric biographychanson de Bertrand du Guesclin and the Roman de la Rose and demonstrates, through the study of textual variation, how texts reflect continually evolving cultural agenda.
Also worth seeing is the Gothic church of St Saveur which has a shrine containing the heart of Bertrand Du Guesclin (1320-80), a Breton and French military commander in the Hundred Years War.
Flower of Chivalry: Bertrand du Guesclin and the Hundred Years War (Boydell & Brewer, 30 [pounds sterling]) by Richard Vernier looks at the rise to glory and considers the legacy of the chivalric hero who led France in the Hundred Years War.
Half an hour away inland is the beautiful mediaeval town of Dinan with crooked half-timbered buildings, cobbled streets and fond memories of one Bertrand du Guesclin, a local knight who beat up the Brits during the Hundred Years War.
1347), the son of Arnaud Amanieu, Lord of Albret; fought under the famous Constable Bertrand du Guesclin in the late 1360s and 1370s; created Constable of France (February 6, 1402); dismissed by King Charles VI when the Burgundian faction gained power and the Count de St.
The town also is noted for its associations with the Breton warrior, Bertrand Du Guesclin, whose heart is buried in the church of St Sauveur.