Bessemer process


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Bessemer process

n.
A method for making steel by blasting compressed air through molten iron to burn out excess carbon and impurities.

[After Sir Henry Bessemer.]

Bessemer process

n
1. (Metallurgy) (formerly) a process for producing steel by blowing air through molten pig iron at about 1250°C in a Bessemer converter: silicon, manganese, and phosphorus impurities are removed and the carbon content is controlled
2. (Metallurgy) a similar process for removing sulphur and iron from copper matte
[C19: named after Sir Henry Bessemer (1813–98), English engineer]

Bes′semer proc`ess


n.
a process of producing steel in which impurities are removed by forcing air through molten iron in a refractory-lined metal container (Bes′semer convert`er).

Bes·se·mer process

(bĕs′ə-mər)
A method for making steel by forcing compressed air through molten iron to burn out carbon and other impurities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bessemer process - an industrial process for making steel using a Bessemer converter to blast air through molten iron and thus burning the excess carbon and impuritiesBessemer process - an industrial process for making steel using a Bessemer converter to blast air through molten iron and thus burning the excess carbon and impurities; the first successful method of making steel in quantity at low cost
industrial process - a systematic series of mechanical or chemical operations that produce or manufacture something
steel production - making steel from pig iron
References in periodicals archive ?
Reduce downtime: The shift from a calendar-based approach-where it is not truly known which equipment is going to fail-to a predictive maintenance approach is as revolutionary as the Bessemer process was in its day.
8 The Bessemer process revolutionised the mass production of which material?
Wales has long been a global leader in steel innovation, with many of the industry's giant leaps forward taking place here: the Bessemer process, pioneered in Dowlais and Ebbw Vale; the Siemens open-hearth process, first demonstrated in Swansea; the Gilchrist-Thomas Basic process, based on work in Blaenavon; and the pioneering Abbey Works at Port Talbot, opened in 1951.
In the Bessemer process, a blow cannot be interrupted to take tests on the state of the steel.