beta decay

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beta decay

n.
Radioactive decay in which a beta particle is emitted by an atomic nucleus.

beta decay

n
(General Physics) the radioactive transformation of an atomic nucleus accompanying the emission of an electron. It involves unit change of atomic number but none in mass number. Also called: beta transformation or beta process

be′ta decay`


n.
a radioactive process in which a beta particle is emitted from the nucleus of an atom.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beta decay - radioactive decay of an atomic nucleus that is accompanied by the emission of a beta particlebeta decay - radioactive decay of an atomic nucleus that is accompanied by the emission of a beta particle
radioactive decay, disintegration, decay - the spontaneous disintegration of a radioactive substance along with the emission of ionizing radiation
References in periodicals archive ?
With its low energy threshold, ultra-low backgrounds and excellent energy resolution, a LXe observatory will be highly sensitive to other rare interactions, such as from solar and supernova neutrinos, double beta decays of 136Xe, as well as from axions and axion-like particles.
The other 99 percent is uranium-238, which is not fissile but rather fertile; if it gains a neutron of the right energy, it turns into uranium-239, which after a couple of beta decays becomes fissile plutonium-239.
The new, unexpected result is that so much energy escapes by neutrino emission that the remaining energy released in the beta decays is not sufficient to ignite the X-ray superbursts that are observed.
With enough neutron captures and beta decays, an evolved intermediate-mass star will eventually turn some of its iron into the molybdenum you need for optimal metabolism.
beta decays [4], CKM unitarity (assumes conserved vector current, CKM unitarity, and values of |[V.
Another class of effects leads to gamma ray asymmetries from beta decays of polarized nuclei produced by interactions of the beam with materials upstream of the hydrogen target.