beta particle

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beta particle

n.
An electron or positron, especially one emitted at high energy in the decay of certain radioactive nuclei.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beta particle

n
(General Physics) a high-speed electron or positron emitted by a nucleus during radioactive decay or nuclear fission
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

be′ta par`ticle


n.
an electron or positron emitted from an atomic nucleus in beta decay.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

beta particle

A high-speed electron emitted by an atomic nucleus undergoing radioactive decay. A beta particle is created when a neutron becomes a proton. Beta particles have greater speed and penetrating power than alpha particles. ♦ The process by which a neutron becomes a proton and emits an electron is called beta decay. Beta decay results in the atomic number of an element being increased by one and its mass number staying the same. See more at radiation, radioactive decay.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beta particle

An electron emitted by an isotope undergoing radioactive decay.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beta particle - a high-speed electron or positron emitted in the decay of a radioactive isotope
subatomic particle, particle - a body having finite mass and internal structure but negligible dimensions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The amount of power generated by the converter depends on the thickness of the nickel foil and the converter itself, because both affect how many beta particles are absorbed.
As beta particles do not penetrate human skin, so long as you don't eat it, tritium is harmless to humans.
It can detect alpha and beta particles when fitted with a very thin window.
Beta radiation is a particulate radiation consisting of high-speed electrons, which are rapidly attenuated by biological tissues (2 MeV beta particles have a range of only 1cm in water) (LOMMATZSCH, 1977; REBHUN, 1990; KIRWAN et al., 2003; DONALDSON et al., 2006).
The particles that are emitted are either alpha particles, beta particles or gamma rays.
It detects radiation such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays using the ionization produced in a Geiger--ME-ller tube, which gives its name to the instrument.
One example consists of polystyrene labeled with tritium that emits beta particles. The polymer is doped with a phosphor, emitting visible light when irradiated by the beta particles from the tritium.
Common contaminants that may be present in municipal water, and well water, include fluoride, if more than 4 ppm, arsenic III and V, chlorine if over 4 ppm, chloramines, chromium 6, lead, pesticides, radioactivity as radon gas, radium, uranium, alpha and beta particles, nitrates, mercury, bacteria, iron and hydrogen sulfide.
Beta particles are released when a neutron in nuclei turns into a proton, or vice versa.
If you had three cookies-one that emits alpha particles, one that emits beta particles, and one that emits gamma rays-which one would you eat, which would you hold, and which would you put in your pocket?
* Beta particles. Beta particles (high-energy, high-speed electrons or positrons) can create radicals by pushing electrons from other atomic or molecular orbitals.