beta-amyloid


Also found in: Medical.

be·ta-am·y·loid

 (bā′tə-ăm′ə-loid′, bē′-)
n.
A protein fragment formed by the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein that aggregates into deposits characteristically found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Also called amyloid beta-peptide, amyloid beta-protein, beta-amyloid peptide, beta-amyloid protein.

[From the beta sheets characterizing its structure.]
References in periodicals archive ?
This new blood test can identify the beta-amyloid proteins that accumulate in the brains of people with Alzheimer's nearly 20 years before symptoms appear.
The brains of Alzheimer's patients who have already developed clinical symptoms contain large clumps of the protein beta-amyloid, known as plaques.
NanoString Technologies announced the publication of a study in the journal Acta Neuropathologica that demonstrates the capability of the GeoMx Digital Spatial Profiler, or DSP, to characterize the microenvironment surrounding beta-Amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease, or AD, patients.
Specifically, their most recent study looked at whether there is an interaction between levels of social activity, cognitive performance, and the amount of beta-amyloid in the brain, which is a neurological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.
Walker and his colleagues found that adults reporting a decline in sleep quality in their 40s and 50s had more beta-amyloid protein in their brains later in life, as measured by positron emission tomography, or PET.
Called Betaclear, the treatment is designed to eliminate the buildup of harmful beta-amyloid toxins in the blood before they can disrupt the connection and proper functioning of brain cells.
Losing just one night of sleep led to an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a small study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Overproduction of the protein beta-amyloid is strongly linked to development of Alzheimer's disease but many drugs targeting beta-amyloid have failed in clinical trials, King's College London (KCL) reports.
Starting in 2005, some of these participants received positron emission tomography (PET) scans using Pittsburgh compound B (PiB), a radioactive compound that can help identify beta-amyloid plaques in neuronal tissue.
Researchers wanted to find other mechanisms that might accelerate the onset of AD in people with beta-amyloid plaques on nerve cells in the brain.
You might be at greater risk of developing beta-amyloid accumulations in your brain, according to new research.
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that losing just one night of sleep led to an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease.