Betjeman


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Bet·je·man

 (bĕch′ə-mən), Sir John 1906-1984.
British poet and poet laureate (1972-1984) whose often nostalgic works, in collections such as A Few Late Chrysanthemums (1954), praise the English countryside. He also wrote widely on Victorian architecture.

Betjeman

(ˈbɛtʃəmən)
n
(Biography) Sir John. 1906–84, English poet, noted for his nostalgic and humorous verse and essays and for his concern for the preservation of historic buildings, esp of the Victorian era. Poet laureate (1972–84)

Bet•je•man

(ˈbɛtʃ ə mən)

n.
Sir John, 1906–84, English poet: poet laureate 1972–84.
References in periodicals archive ?
POET laureate Sir John Betjeman waxed lyrical about Huddersfield Railway Station.
Poet John Betjeman lampooned it in the 30s writing: "Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough
1984: Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972, died aged 77.
Meanwhile, my predecessor in Barry, Alec McKinty, rang up to comment on my mentioning Sir John Betjeman last week.
In 1933, for example, John Betjeman had published Ghastly Good Taste: Or, a Depressing Story of the Rise and Fall of English Architecture with satiric illustrations by Osbert Lancaster.
But as his biographer Bevis Hillier notes, he was particularly absorbed "in recherche Nonconformist sects" (Young Betjeman 348).
In 1955, John Betjeman, in his introduction to the first collection of Thomas's poetry to be produced by a major publisher, Song at the Year''s Turning, predicted that Thomas would be remembered long after Betjeman himself was forgotten.
It was not only, (as John Betjeman would have said), "for the shining ones who dwell, safe in the Dorchester Hotel".
IT'S the Midland manufacturing town that once drew the admiration of the late great poet Sir John Betjeman.
John Betjeman was a British poet and public figure who was known for his devotion to preserving Victorian architecture and satirical writings on suburban London.
Past recipients of the Gold Medal include WH Auden (1936), John Betjeman (1960), Philip Larkin (1965), Stevie Smith (1969) and Ted Hughes (1974).