Laocoon

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La·oc·o·on

 (lā-ŏk′ə-ŏn′)
n. Greek Mythology
A Trojan priest of Apollo who was killed along with his two sons by two sea serpents for having warned his people of the Trojan horse.

Laocoon

(leɪˈɒkəʊˌɒn)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a priest of Apollo at Troy who warned the Trojans against the wooden horse left by the Greeks; killed with his twin sons by two sea serpents

La•oc•o•ön

(leɪˈɒk oʊˌɒn)

n.
a Trojan priest who, after warning against the acceptance of the wooden horse left at Troy by the Greeks, was killed along with his sons by two serpents.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Laocoon - (Greek mythology) the priest of Apollo who warned the Trojans to beware of Greeks bearing gifts when they wanted to accept the Trojan HorseLaocoon - (Greek mythology) the priest of Apollo who warned the Trojans to beware of Greeks bearing gifts when they wanted to accept the Trojan Horse; a god who favored the Greeks (Poseidon or Athena) sent snakes who coiled around Laocoon and his two twin sons killing them
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations

Laocoon

[leɪˈɒkəʊˌɒn] nLaocoonte
References in periodicals archive ?
Or the old saying, beware of Greeks bearing gifts? Learn from Malaysia's Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, who canceled projects with China to avoid being trapped.
Beware of Greeks bearing gifts,' the priest Laocoon told the people of Troy in Virgil's 'The Aeneid.' His warning was, of course, famously ignored, and the citizens of the once-free city fell to the invading Greek army from across the sea, thanks to the equally famous Trojan Horse ruse.
THEY may say, 'Beware of Greeks bearing gifts', but there was nothing but genuine hospitality when the elderly couple living near my island villa sat me down with a generous glass of raki and a smile when I appeared at their door asking for help after locking myself out without my phone.
The ideas of liberty and citizenship, the Western calendar, phrases such as "beware of Greeks bearing gifts" and much more came from this one source.
Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. Or borrowing money.