Bewick's swan


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Bewick's swan

(ˈbjuːɪks)
n
(Animals) a white Old World swan, Cygnus bewickii, having a black bill with a small yellow base
[named after Thomas Bewick, noted esp for his woodcuts of birds]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bewick's swan - Eurasian subspecies of tundra swanBewick's swan - Eurasian subspecies of tundra swan; smaller than the whooper
Cygnus columbianus, tundra swan - swan that nests in tundra regions of the New and Old Worlds
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The giant animals, some up to 12 times life size, include Natalie the Nene, the world's rarest goose, Kate the Kingfisher and Benedict the Bewick's swan, magnificently stretching his brick wings.
Enjoy the nine individually-designed LEGO brick characters, some up to twelve times life size, include Natalie the Nene, the world's rarest goose, Flavia the Andean flamingo and Benedict the Bewick's swan, magnificently stretching his brick wings.
CHANGES to farming practices in the UK are not the cause of a crash in Bewick's swan numbers, research suggests.
The biologist, who is head of media for the Wildfowl and Wetland Trust, then realised she could use her flying skills to help highlight the plight of the endangered Bewick's swan. She made worldwide headlines last year when she travelled 4500 miles in a motorised paraglider from the Arctic to the UK following the migration route of the swan.
The Bewick's Swan, named after the engraver and wildlife author, is Europe's smallest swan and is increasingly under threat from habitat loss.
They have already recorded their first Bewick's Swan of the winter a full 25 days earlier than its 2014 counterpart.
The whistling swan and its Eurasian counterpart, the Bewick's swan, were formerly considered separate species, but were more recently lumped under the inclusive name "tundra swan."
They include the Bewick's Swan, one of the few species to pair for life with the same partner.
The swan was later named Bewick's swan, in memory of the North East engraver and naturalist Thomas Bewick.
Over the same period, numbers of whooper swan have also risen, increasing by 122 per cent, but Bewick's swan has declined by 44 per cent.
The Severn Estuary is the second most important site for waterbirds in Wales, after the Dee Estuary which is home to 129,271 birds and has also seven internationally important species: the mute swan, bewick's swan, shelduck, pintail, shoveler, ringed plover and dunlin.