bezoar

(redirected from Bezoars)
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be·zoar

 (bē′zôr′)
n.
A hard indigestible mass of material, such as hair, plant fibers, or seeds, found in the stomach or intestine of animals, especially ruminants and sometimes humans. Bezoars were formerly considered to be antidotes to poisons and to possess magic properties.

[Middle English bezear, stone used as antidote to poison, probably from Old French bezahar, gastric or intestinal mass used as antidote to poison, from Arabic bāzahr, from Persian pādzahr : pād-, protector (from Avestan pātar-; see pā- in Indo-European roots) + zahr, poison (from Middle Persian; see gwhen- in Indo-European roots).]

bezoar

(ˈbiːzɔː)
n
(Medicine) a hard mass, such as a stone or hairball, in the stomach and intestines of animals, esp ruminants, and man: formerly thought to be an antidote to poisons
[C15: from Old French bézoard, from Arabic bāzahr, from Persian bādzahr, from bād against + zahr poison]

be•zoar

(ˈbi zɔr, -zoʊr)

n.
a calculus or concretion found in the stomach or intestines of certain animals, esp. ruminants, formerly reputed to be an effective remedy for poison.
[1470–80; bezear < Medieval Latin bezahar < Arabic bā(di) zahr < Persian pād-zahr counterpoison]
Translations

be·zoar

n. bezoar, concreción formada de distintas materias tal como fibras vegetales y pelo, presente en el estómago tanto en el intestino humano como el de los animales.

bezoar

n bezoar m
References in classic literature ?
All this coast is much infested with ravenous beasts, monkeys, and serpents, of which last here are some seven feet in length, and thicker than an ordinary man; in the head of this serpent is found a stone about the bigness of an egg, resembling bezoar, and of great efficacy, as it is said, against all kinds of poison.
The bezoar, that was found in the heart of the Arabian deer, was a charm that could cure the plague.
rock, hair) in the gastrointestinal tract may form bezoars and result in partial or complete mechanical obstruction in the digestive tract (1,2).
Major benign causes of gastric outlet obstruction are peptic ulcer diseases, gastric polyps, ingestion of caustics, pyloric stenosis, congenital duodenal web, gallstone obstruction (Bouveret syndrome), pancreatic pseudocyst, and bezoars.
The nonspecific appearance of a gossypiboma has resulted in this entity being mistaken for tumours of the retroperitoneum, pancreas and spleen, gastrointestinal stromal tumours, and hydatid cystic disease, as well as bezoars.
Renal aspergillosis may lead to formation of focal abscesses, fungal bezoars and may cause ureteric obstruction.
Bezoars and concretions, comprehensive review of literature with analysis of 303 collected cases and presentation of 8 additional cases.
2] From twelfth to eighteenth centuries, physicians used bezoars as antidotes against plague, snakebite, leprosy, and epilepsy.
Bezoars are collections of indigestible material that accumulate in the GI tract and are most often located in the stomach.
The bezoars are concretions or masses of foreign material seen in different locations of gastrointestinal tract.