Bhutas


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Bhutas

In Ayurvedic medicine these are the five elements from which all things are made—air, fire, earth, ether, and water— and which correspond to one of the senses (touch, sight, smell, sound, taste) and to a planet (Mercury, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Venus).
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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There are, however, several Indian traditional lists of six "elements" called dhatus; they usually include the five material elements or bhutas (earth, water, fire, air, ether) plus a sixth element described as consciousness (vijnana, cetana) or the Self (atman).
Mysterious magical rebels, known as the Bhutas, and a handsome, young imperial guard combine to complicate her path to the throne, as well as teach her about herself and her roots.
It is flanked by Pancha Bhutas and Navagrahas temples.
But Pasupati is also the Lord of the ganas and bhutas, a class of demi-gods and demons attending Siva; hence the appearance of a demon in the retinue does not seem inappropriate.
Some of the nameless bhutas present in the air may be satisfied with a little food left for them or with grain thrown in the air.
He explained that Alva's family deities (bhutas) had been neglected and so kept him from having children.
MAY 14-15: BASTYR UNIVERSITY presents FIVE ELEMENT ACUPRESSURE: Enlivening the Bhutas @ Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington (near Seattle).
svavisayam upagamya manavendro 'v[b]alim upayacitakdni cadhikani | nigaditavidhinaiva sampradadyat prathama[matha]ganasurabhutadaivatebhyah || 5 || BY 34 || (23) Having arrived at his own country, the king should confer bali and further favors to the host of Pramathas, Asuras, Bhutas, and gods, according to the procedure [already] mentioned.
259), all profitably; but he does not mention that after the death of Iravat (Arjuna's son with the serpent woman Ulupi) on the eighth day of battle, the warriors on both sides fought on with heightened intensity, "possessed (avistah) by Raksasas and Bhutas" (Mbh 6.86.85).
His investigation uses an all-inclusive term "spirit-deities" for beings such as yaksas, nagas, guhyakas, bhutas, pretas, gandharvas, pitrs, kumbhandas, pisacas, vrksadevatas (rukkhadevatas), vetalas, mahoragas, devaputras, vidyadharas, kimpurusas.