Biblical Aramaic


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Related to Biblical Aramaic: Aramaic language, Aramaic alphabet

Biblical Aramaic

n
1. (Bible) the form of Aramaic that was the common language of Palestine in New Testament times. It was widespread throughout the Persian Empire from the 5th century and is found in the later books of the Old Testament (esp Daniel 2:4–7:28)
2. (Languages) the form of Aramaic that was the common language of Palestine in New Testament times. It was widespread throughout the Persian Empire from the 5th century and is found in the later books of the Old Testament (esp Daniel 2:4–7:28)
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Noun1.Biblical Aramaic - the form of Aramaic that was spoken in Palestine in the time of the New Testament
Aramaic - a Semitic language originally of the ancient Arameans but still spoken by other people in southwestern Asia
References in periodicals archive ?
Old Testament, Hebrew, and other scholars from Europe examine the deep rootedness of Biblical law in the Ancient Near Eastern legal tradition, the syntax of Biblical Aramaic, the latest edition of Lettinga's Hebrew grammar, the challenges of teaching Hebrew in a theology curriculum, the link between historical-linguistic descriptions of the origins of Hebrew and ancient Israel's history, and the relationship between Hebrew philology and Old Testament interpretation and texts from the books of Samuel, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Hosea, as well as the "sons of God" in the non-Biblical texts in the Dead Sea Scrolls.
(9) Finally, Aramaic has made its own contribution to this newly proposed etymology, offering the particles hlw (Imperial Aramaic) and 'aluw (Biblical Aramaic) for consideration in the conversation about Hebrew hl'.
Why use "Hebrew Scriptures" when some of the books of that canon are in Biblical Aramaic? If one were to go by the original language of the Testaments, then should not the New Testament be "The Greek Testament" or the "Koine Greek Testament" (He Kaine Diatheke)?
The verbal system of biblical Aramaic; a distributional approach.
His Oxford research was on biblical Aramaic, the language in which part of Daniel was written, and he followed up the publication of this with a study entitled Darius the Mede and the Four World Empires in the Book of Daniel: A Historical Study of Contemporary Theories (1935).
He indicates the adjustments forced on the translator by the differences which separate Syriac from biblical Hebrew--and, interestingly, from biblical Aramaic. He also documents the effects of the translator's drive for clarity and consistency, and the various techniques applied to difficult passages.
There are no complete paradigms for Biblical Aramaic (Rosenthal 1961: 71).
Although the entries in his glossary are brief, Fassberg goes beyond the usual practices of documentary linguists by supplying the original form of each term in its presumptive source language (especially in the case of loan words from Arabic and Hebrew as well as Kurdish, Turkish, and other unrelated languages) and/or cognates from other dialects such as Biblical Aramaic, Syriac, and other Neo-Aramaic dialects.
The qitl pattern is also attested in Biblical Aramaic (as gism) within suffixed forms: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Dan.
These sections will be of interest not only to the scholar who specializes in Syriac or Iranian languages, but also to those who study Imperial Aramaic, Biblical Aramaic, and Jewish Babylonian Aramaic, since the author collects in one place the various morphological and syntactic borrowings that have influenced Aramaic since the Persian era, including such things as the qtyl l- construction.
In Biblical Aramaic we have four imperative forms of I-' verbs: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] 'emar 'say,' [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] '[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] 'go,' [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] 'akuli 'eat,' [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] 'emaru 'say.' In three of these cases we can easily recognize attestations of the pairs: i-a ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]) and a-u ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]) assuming that the hetef-segol stands for an original /i/.
Most West Semitic languages use a reflex of a basic element *[delta]V: for near deixis in the singular, as, for example, Hebrew ze (ms) < *[delta]i, Biblical Aramaic da(') and Ge'ez za (fs) < *[delta]a, while far deixis is either expressed by a suffix -k or the anaphoric pronoun, as in BA dek (ms) and Ge'ez zeku (ms) < *[delta]ik(u), Hebrew hu(') and Old South Arabian h' / hw' (3ms anaphoric pronoun).