exegesis

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Related to Biblical exegete: exegeses, Bible exegete, Scriptural exegesis

ex·e·ge·sis

 (ĕk′sə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. ex·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
Critical explanation or analysis, especially of a text.

[Greek exēgēsis, from exēgeisthai, to interpret : ex-, ex- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

ex′e·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk), ex′e·get′i·cal adj.
ex′e·get′i·cal·ly adv.

exegesis

(ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) explanation or critical interpretation of a text, esp of the Bible. Compare eisegesis
[C17: from Greek, from exēgeisthai to interpret, from ex-1 + hēgeisthai to guide]

ex•e•ge•sis

(ˌɛk sɪˈdʒi sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
critical explanation or interpretation, esp. of Scripture.
[1610–20; < Greek exḗgēsis an interpretation =exēgē-, variant s. of exēgeîsthai to show the way, interpret]
ex`e•get′ic (-ˈdʒɛt ɪk) ex`e•get′i•cal, adj.
ex`e•get′i•cal•ly, adv.

exegesis

a critical interpretation or explication, especially of biblical and other religious texts. — exegetic, exegetical, adj.
See also: Criticism
critical explication or interpretation of Scripture.
See also: Bible
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exegesis - an explanation or critical interpretation (especially of the Bible)
Christian Bible, Good Book, Holy Scripture, Holy Writ, Scripture, Bible, Word of God, Book, Word - the sacred writings of the Christian religions; "he went to carry the Word to the heathen"
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"

exegesis

noun explanation, interpretation, clarification, exposition, explication a substantial exegesis of his work

exegesis

noun
1. Critical explanation or analysis:
Translations
egzegeza

exegesis

[ˌeksɪˈdʒiːsɪs] N (exegeses (pl)) [ˌeksɪˈdʒiːsiːz]exégesis f

exegesis

[ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs] [exegeses] [ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsiːz] (pl) nexégèse f

exegesis

nExegese f, → Auslegung f

exegesis

[ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs] n (frm) → esegesi f
References in periodicals archive ?
For he is neither a theologian nor a philosopher, neither a pastor nor a preacher, nor a Biblical exegete. Nor is he known to have engaged in so sustained a personal study of religion as to qualify him to be a serious commentator on religious matters.
The Catholic Church, however, has always acknowledged Saint Ephrem a 'great poet, orator, teacher, biblical exegete, theologian, composer of hymns and defender of faith.'
The remaining essays cover subjects including Bonaventure's theological and philosophical method, his work as a biblical exegete, his trinitarian theology, his Christology in the Breviloquium, his angelology, sacramental theology, Christocentric spirituality, preaching, and his legacy as minister general and defender of mendicant religious life.
Schwartz's The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image is an important addition to the ever-extending list of new thinking about the life, works, and reception of Baruch (Benedict) Spinoza, the seventeenth-century philosopher, political theorist, and biblical exegete, who was excommunicated by Amsterdam's Sephardic Jewish community.
Recognizing Musculus' identity as both a biblical exegete and a systematic theologian, Ballor draws material from his commentaries on Scripture and his Loci Communes.
Any biblical exegete or translator should take into consideration the fact that the conversations have their own socio-cultural context and that modern methods from "sociology, critical geography, socio-linguistics, and social psychology," properly controlled, are useful and should be applied to better understand ancient biblical texts.
(1) In the Middle Ages, the talmudic commentator and biblical exegete Samuel Ben Meir, known as the Rashbam, (ca.
Now a theological wizard I am not, and no one has ever accused me of being a great biblical exegete. But according to my Bible dictionary, the verb "evangelize" comes from the Greek meaning "to announce news," and it is usually rendered as "preach the gospel" in the New Testament.
but must also contain musar (ethical teaching) and tockachot (criticism and reproof) Whatever his prejudices as biblical exegete, Fromm, it must be said, made his writings rich in both musar and tochachot.
Hispano-Hebrew poet, grammarian, philosopher, and astronomer, best known as a biblical exegete whose commentaries contributed to the golden age of Spanish Judaism.
So, today, I turn to hermeneutics, and summon help from my brother, the biblical exegete.
There is no question that the Christian apologist and biblical exegete Clement (ca 150-215) wrote it, he says, though it seems to be a loose collection of philosophical excerpts, perhaps with Clement's own commentary or observations.

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