citation

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ci·ta·tion

 (sī-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of citing.
2.
a. A quotation of or explicit reference to a source for substantiation, as in a scholarly paper.
b. Law A reference to a previous court decision or other authority for a point of law, usually by case title and other information.
3. Enumeration or mention, as of facts, especially:
a. An official commendation for meritorious action, especially in military service: a citation for bravery.
b. A formal statement of the accomplishments of one being honored with an academic degree.
4. An official summons, especially one calling for appearance in court.

ci·ta′tion·al adj.
ci′ta·to′ry (sī′tə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

citation

(saɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the quoting of a book or author in support of a fact
2. a passage or source cited for this purpose
3. a listing or recounting, as of facts
4. (Military) an official commendation or award, esp for bravery or outstanding service, work, etc, usually in the form of a formal statement made in public
5. (Law) law
a. an official summons to appear in court
b. the document containing such a summons
6. (Law) law the quoting of decided cases to serve as guidance to a court
citatory adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ci•ta•tion

(saɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of citing or quoting.
2. a reference to an authority or a precedent, esp. in law.
3. a passage cited; quotation.
4.
a. mention of a soldier or a unit in official dispatches, usu. for gallantry.
b. an award, decoration, or the like, for exceptional military bravery.
5. any award or commendation, esp. for outstanding service or devotion to duty.
6.
a. a summons, esp. to appear in court.
b. a document containing such a summons.
7. a quotation showing a particular word or phrase in context.
8. mention or enumeration.
[1250–1300; Middle English< Late Latin citātiō= Latin citā(re) (see cite1) + -tiō -tion]
ci•ta′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

citation

A summons ordering someone to appear in court.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.citation - an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statementcitation - an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statement
accolade, honor, laurels, honour, award - a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction; "an award for bravery"
2.citation - (law) the act of citing (as of spoken words or written passages or legal precedents etc.)
speech act - the use of language to perform some act
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.citation - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passagecitation - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage; "the student's essay failed to list several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article includes mention of similar clinical cases"
annotation, notation, note - a comment or instruction (usually added); "his notes were appended at the end of the article"; "he added a short notation to the address on the envelope"
photo credit - a note acknowledging the source of a published photograph
cross-index, cross-reference - a reference at one place in a work to information at another place in the same work
4.citation - a passage or expression that is quoted or cited
excerpt, excerption, extract, selection - a passage selected from a larger work; "he presented excerpts from William James' philosophical writings"
epigraph - a quotation at the beginning of some piece of writing
mimesis - the representation of another person's words in a speech
misquotation, misquote - an incorrect quotation
5.citation - a summons that commands the appearance of a party at a proceeding
process, summons - a writ issued by authority of law; usually compels the defendant's attendance in a civil suit; failure to appear results in a default judgment against the defendant
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
6.Citation - thoroughbred that won the triple crown in 1948
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

citation

noun
1. commendation, award, mention His citation says he showed outstanding and exemplary courage.
2. quotation, quote, reference, passage, illustration, excerpt The text is full of Biblical citations.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

citation

[saɪˈteɪʃən]
A. Ncita f (US) (Jur) → citación f (Mil) → mención f, citación f
B. CPD citation index Níndice m de citación
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

citation

[saɪˈteɪʃən] n
(= commendation) → éloge m
(US) (= summons) → P.-V. m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

citation

n
(= quote)Zitat nt; (= act of quoting)Zitieren nt
(Mil) → Belobigung f, → lobende Erwähnung
(Jur) → Vorladung f(vor Gericht)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

citation

[saɪˈteɪʃn] ncitazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
relevant article, and relevant article, and creates a reasonably creates a reasonably correct APA style for correct APA style for the the bibliographic bibliographic citation for citation for the the article, but not both.
Since the DOI uniquely identifies that article, independent of the date of the periodical issue in which it appears, the DOI citation might eventually take precedence over the article's bibliographic citation. Articles become citable when they are first assigned a unique identifier and made accessible to readers, rather than only when they are citable within the context of a specific publication issue.
Recently, our cherished journal, Investigacion y Educacion en Enfermeria, was added to Thomson Reuters' Web of Knowledge (formerly ISI-Thomson) bibliographic citation index, which covers the most important and influential specialized international journals in all areas of knowledge and which annually publishes information on impact factors in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR).
The current bibliographic citation analysis indicates that a sizeable minority (about 33%) of the literature on the topic of Facebook is general in scope, or reports on esoteric issues.
The CD-ROM contains all bibliographic citation and locations.
The duo rolled out EasyBib to simplify the bibliographic citation process in 2001.
The bibliographic citation for the periodical being browsed appears at the top of the page for easy reference.
As mentioned before, the complete bibliographic citation is viewed in the fight column of the Zotero window (Figure 7).
Of special note is a new chapter focused on dealing with bibliographic citation managers such as 'EndNote'.
A "Bibliography" button opens a smaller window that gives a complete bibliographic citation for the open document.
Minor infelicities in editing and formatting and oddities in bibliographic citation only marginally detract from the interest of Rosenfeld's argument, which, given the pervasiveness of multiple editions of literary works, should suggest fruitful avenues of inquiry for others working in the field.
The source usually was a bibliographic citation for a larger publication that might have the details you needed.

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