bicarbonate

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Related to Bicarbonates: hydrogen carbonate, Carbides, Hco3

bi·car·bon·ate

 (bī-kär′bə-nāt′, -nĭt)
n.
The polyatomic anion HCO3- or a compound, such as sodium bicarbonate, containing it.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bicarbonate

(baɪˈkɑːbənɪt; -ˌneɪt)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a salt of carbonic acid containing the ion HCO3; an acid carbonate
2. (Elements & Compounds) (modifier) consisting of, containing, or concerned with the ion HCO3: a bicarbonate compound. Systematic name: hydrogen carbonate
3. (Elements & Compounds) short for bicarbonate of soda
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bi•car•bo•nate

(baɪˈkɑr bə nɪt, -ˌneɪt)

n.
a salt of carbonic acid, containing the HCO3− group.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kär′bə-nāt′)
The group HCO3 or a compound containing it, such as sodium bicarbonate.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bicarbonate - a salt of carbonic acid (containing the anion HCO3) in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced; an acid carbonate
baking soda, bicarbonate of soda, saleratus, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate - a white soluble compound (NaHCO3) used in effervescent drinks and in baking powders and as an antacid
carbonate - a salt or ester of carbonic acid (containing the anion CO3)
potassium acid carbonate, potassium bicarbonate, potassium hydrogen carbonate - a crystalline salt (KHCO3) that is used in baking powder and as an antacid
calcium bicarbonate - a bicarbonate that is a major cause of hard water
magnesium bicarbonate - a bicarbonate that is a major cause of hard water
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

bi·car·bon·ate

n. bicarbonato, sal de ácido carbónico, bicarbonato sodico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bicarbonate

n bicarbonato
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Caustic potash has a great affinity for carbonic acid; and it is sufficient to shake it in order for it to seize upon the acid and form bicarbonate of potassium.
To maintain the alkalinity of the pancreatic juice, the bile, the liver, and particularly the pancreas extract bicarbonates and minerals from the blood.
Chronic metabolic acidosis mainly distresses two alkaline digestive glands: the liver and pancreas, which secrete alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a great amount of bicarbonate. The acidic shift in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can cause serious biochemical/ biomechanical problems.
Correlation of metabolic acidosis in diarrhoeic calves by oral administration of electrolyte solutions with or without bicarbonates. J.
alongwith the 7.5 % sodium bicarbonate 1 ml / kg b wt i.v.
Patients with elevated bicarbonate levels were experiencing overdoses of bicarbonates because of the elevated bicarbonate levels in both GranuFlo[R] and NaturaLyte[R].
Many doctors were unaware of the elevated bicarbonate levels in GranuFlo[R] and NaturaLyte[R].
The naturally occurring bicarbonates are the body's first line of defense against increased acidity.
The results of ANOVA indicated a significant effect of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on blood concentration of bicarbonates ([F.sub.(2.28)] = 18.06 p < 0.01, Figure 2).
Groundwater in other areas of Sweden contains bicarbonates that display similarly low ratios of carbon-13, "and these bicarbonates have a surface origin in the peat bogs or pine forests,' says Valley.
During treatment, these are mixed with bicarbonates to treat acid build up in the blood.
Bicarbonate compounds are being considered as promising alternative functional ingredients that may provide similar or enhanced functional properties as phosphate.