biconditional


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biconditional

(ˌbaɪkənˈdɪʃənəl)
n
another name for equivalence2
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He also insists that the BPA is not biconditional (wisely, since otherwise goodness becomes a "Cambridge property"), which leaves him with the task of explaining why goodness arises only in a subset of cases in which lower-order properties ground reasons.
It could be that people understand this kind of conditional as a biconditional. In that case, we should expect that this conditional form will prime people to read the negative possibility not p and not q more quickly, compared to other conditionals (if p then q, only if p q and p only if q).
In some cases, the circularity we see with the occurrence of G on the right of the biconditional leads to an infinite loop in the applications of this rule.
That is, the extreme nominalist is committed to a reductive analysis of attributes such as a biconditional of the following kind:
This identity claim, it is plausible to say, is what makes the biconditional principle above true.
(No claim of metaphysical or epistemic priority is intended here; this is just a biconditional.) But dispositions of practical thought are also traits of character; they consequently can be evaluated as traits of character.
The notion of necessity involved is an intuitive one.) In her 1996, Sher calls this biconditional "Tarski's adequacy conjecture," or sometimes just "Tarski's conjecture".
The simplest way of doing so is to take the biconditional that Wallace himself accepts--A is a morally responsible agent if and only if A has the capacity to recognize and act on moral reasons--and to add that judging someone to be responsible need involve no more than believing that she has that capacity.
Since they are too weak to work with (3) to yield an argument for compatibilism, it seems reasonable to consider strengthening them by making each into a biconditional, as follows:
To define a predicate "F," one formulates a universally quantified biconditional, where "F(x)" occurs alone on the left-hand side and a more or less complex proposition "[PHI](x)" occurs on the right-hand side:
To be adequate, such a (finitely axiomatizable) truth theory should allow us to infer for every (indexical-free) sentence s of the object language a biconditional (T-theorem) of the form
our principle is simply a conditional, rather than a biconditional. That