dialect

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di·a·lect

 (dī′ə-lĕkt′)
n.
1.
a. A regional or social variety of a language distinguished by pronunciation, grammar, or vocabulary, especially a variety of speech differing from the standard literary language or speech pattern of the culture in which it exists: Cockney is a dialect of English.
b. A variety of language that with other varieties constitutes a single language of which no single variety is standard: the dialects of Ancient Greek.
2. The language peculiar to the members of a group, especially in an occupation; jargon: the dialect of science.
3. The manner or style of expressing oneself in language or the arts.
4. A language considered as part of a larger family of languages or a linguistic branch. Not in scientific use: Spanish and French are Romance dialects.

[French dialecte, from Old French, from Latin dialectus, form of speech, from Greek dialektos, speech, from dialegesthai, to discourse, use a dialect : dia-, between, over; see dia- + legesthai, middle voice of legein, to speak; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

di′a·lec′tal adj.
di′a·lec′tal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dialect

(ˈdaɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics)
a. a form of a language spoken in a particular geographical area or by members of a particular social class or occupational group, distinguished by its vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation
b. a form of a language that is considered inferior: the farmer spoke dialect and was despised by the merchants.
c. (as modifier): a dialect word.
[C16: from Latin dialectus, from Greek dialektos speech, dialect, discourse, from dialegesthai to converse, from legein to talk, speak]
ˌdiaˈlectal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•a•lect

(ˈdaɪ əˌlɛkt)

n.
1. a variety of a language distinguished from other varieties by features of phonology, grammar, and vocabulary and by its use by a group of speakers set off from others geographically or socially.
2. a provincial, rural, or socially distinct variety of a language that differs from the standard language.
3. any special variety of a language: the literary dialect.
4. a language considered as one of a group that have a common ancestor: Persian, Latin, and English are Indo-European dialects.
[1545–55; < Latin dialectus < Greek diálektos discourse, language, dialect, n. derivative of dialégesthai to converse (dia- dia- + légein to speak)]
syn: See language.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dialect

a variety of a language peculiar to a particular region or group within a larger community, usually but not always existing in the spoken form only. — dialectal, adj.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dialect

1. A form of a language used in a particular region or by a particular group of people.
2. Any of several versions of BASIC using slightly different commands.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dialect - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of peopledialect - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people; "the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English"; "he has a strong German accent"; "it has been said that a language is a dialect with an army and navy"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
eye dialect - the use of misspellings to identify a colloquial or uneducated speaker
patois - a regional dialect of a language (especially French); usually considered substandard
spang, bang - leap, jerk, bang; "Bullets spanged into the trees"
forrad, forrard, forward, forwards, frontward, frontwards - at or to or toward the front; "he faced forward"; "step forward"; "she practiced sewing backward as well as frontward on her new sewing machine"; (`forrad' and `forrard' are dialectal variations)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dialect

noun language, speech, tongue, jargon, idiom, vernacular, brogue, lingo (informal), patois, provincialism, localism the number of Italians who speak only local dialect
Quotations
"Dialect words - those terrible marks of the beast to the truly genteel" [Thomas Hardy The Mayor of Casterbridge]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dialect

noun
1. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
2. A system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture:
Linguistics: langue.
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لهجةلَهْجَةلَهْجَه، لُغَه مَحَلِّيَّه
диалект
dialecte
nářečí
dialekt
لحجه
murrealuemurre
narječjedijalekt
nyelvjárástájszólás
dialek
mállýskamállÿska
方言
방언사투리
dialectosdialectus
dialektastarmė
dialektsizloksne
nárečie
narečje
dialekt
ภาษาท้องถิ่น
tiếng địa phương

dialect

[ˈdaɪəlekt]
A. Ndialecto m
B. CPD dialect atlas Natlas m inv lingüístico
dialect survey Nestudio m dialectológico
dialect word Ndialectalismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dialect

[ˈdaɪəlɛkt] ndialecte m
in dialect → en dialectedialling code n (British)indicatif mdialling tone n (British)tonalité fdialog box dialogue box n (COMPUTING)boîte f de dialogue
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dialect

nDialekt m; (local, rural also) → Mundart f; the country people spoke in dialectdie Landbevölkerung sprach Dialekt; the play is in dialectdas Stück ist in Dialekt or Mundart geschrieben
attrDialekt-; dialect wordDialektausdruck m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dialect

[ˈdaɪəˌlɛkt] ndialetto
the local dialect → il dialetto del luogo
dialect word → termine m dialettale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dialect

(ˈdaiəlekt) noun
a way of speaking found only in a certain area or among a certain group or class of people. They were speaking in dialect.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

dialect

لَهْجَة nářečí dialekt Dialekt διάλεκτος dialecto murre dialecte narječje dialetto 方言 방언 dialect dialekt dialekt dialeto диалект dialekt ภาษาท้องถิ่น lehçe tiếng địa phương 方言
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Nichols 414 U.S., 563-572] Unfortunately, language diversity often has been considered a problem rather than a resource (Ruiz, 1984), and bilingualism and bidialectism have inappropriately been seen as causes of cognitive deficiencies among students (Baker, 1996; Hakuta, 1986; Trueba, 1989; Wiley, 1996a; Zanger, 1991).