Bierce


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Bierce

 (bîrs), Ambrose Gwinett 1842-1914?
American writer whose works, including In the Midst of Life (1891-1892) and The Devil's Dictionary (1906), are marked by caustic wit and a strong sense of horror.

Bierce

(bɪəs)
n
(Biography) Ambrose (Gwinett). 1842–?1914, US journalist and author of humorous sketches, horror stories, and tales of the supernatural: he disappeared during a mission in Mexico (1913)

Bierce

(bɪərs)

n.
Ambrose (Gwinnett), 1842–1914?, U.S. author.
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Noun1.Bierce - United States writer of caustic wit (1842-1914)
References in classic literature ?
written by one Ambrose Bierce, an avowed and confirmed misanthrope of the period: "Grapeshot, n.
Mencken once nicked Bierce for reprinting his early work, which was "filled with epigrams against frauds long dead and forgotten, and echoes of old and puerile newspaper controversies.
Even though they might seem like a very electronic invention, emoticons are said to have been first suggested back in 1887 by Ambrose Bierce Bierce, who thought of adding a smiley face character to the set of already established punctuation marks.
Ambrose Bierce and the Period of Honorable Strife: The Civil War and the Emergence of an American Writer
Driving through the Chihuahua Desert, they retrace the route of nineteenth-century American writer Ambrose Bierce (who disappeared during the Mexican Revolution) and try to piece together their lives after a devastating incident involving their adolescent son.
The two stories I analyze in order to show their distinctiveness are "One of the Missing" (1888) by the US-American writer Ambrose Bierce and "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" ("The Manuscript from Kitab-An") by Macedonian writer Vlada Uroshevic.
Bierce served in the Union army through most of the American Civil War, and later became a famous journalist and essayist.
This subjective quality used in Mailer's war fiction and reporting owes a great debt to the war writings of the Civil War authors Ambrose Bierce and Stephen Crane.
Speak when you're angry and you'll give the best speech you'll ever regret,'' said Ambrose Bierce.
Betty Jane Bierce, a genuine San Antonio rose born in 1921, had a tough choice: Should she stick with Betty Jane or go with her modeling name, Poni (which had nothing to do with cowgirl skills)?
But one need only glance at the stories of Edgar Allan Poe and Ambrose Bierce, or the grim reality chronicled in books like Wisconsin Death Trip, to realize that there was also an undercurrent of madness, despair, and scientific ignorance.