Big Bang


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Big Bang

n.
The beginning of space, time, matter, energy, and of the expansion of the universe according to the Big Bang theory.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

big bang

n
1. any sudden forceful beginning or radical change
2. (Astronomy) (modifier) of or relating to the big-bang theory
3. (Banking & Finance) (sometimes capitals) the major modernization that took place on the London Stock Exchange on Oct 27 1986, after which the distinction between jobbers and brokers was abolished and operations became fully computerized
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Big′ Bang′


n.
(sometimes l.c.) the cosmic explosion of matter postulated by the big bang theory.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

big bang

(bĭg)
The violent explosion of an extremely small, hot, and dense body of matter between 12 and 18 billion years ago. It is viewed as the earliest event in a widely held model of the origin of the universe. Compare steady state universe.
Did You Know? It's a chilling thought: In the 1920s, astronomers found that wherever they looked in space, distant galaxies were rapidly moving away from Earth. In other words, the universe was getting larger and larger. By calculating the speed of several galaxies and working back from there, astronomers learned that this expansion began between 12 and 18 billion years ago, when the entire universe was smaller than a dime and almost infinitely dense. According to the widely accepted theory of the big bang, a massive explosion kicked off the expansion and was the origin of space and time. Now scientists must figure out how much mass the universe contains in order to see what lies ahead. If there is enough mass, the gravity attracting all the pieces to each other will eventually stop the expansion and pull all the pieces of the universe back together in a "big crunch." The universe would then be a closed universe. However, there may not be enough mass to support a universe that is closed. If that is the case, then an open universe would expand forever, and all the galaxies and stars would drift away from each other and become dark and cold.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

big bang

The day in 1986 when, in the course of one day, the London Stock Exchange was deregulated and new computing technology brought in.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
blowup, detonation, explosion - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reaction
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Presently there was a big BANG! The ship stopped and rolled over on its side.
"As a regional employer, the Big Bang is a wonderful opportunity for school and college students to find out more about the diverse career opportunities open to them in the region and to bring together employers to focus on key issues and celebrate achievements."
Sure, with the big bang model, we have explanations for some of the above.
A decade ago, spurred by a question for a fifth-grade science project, John Cramer devised an audio recreation of the Big Bang that started our universe nearly 14 billion years ago.
Upon being seated in the arena, fans began chanting the names of the members and screaming as their favorites were shown on the screens, where Big Bang's music videos were being played.
Since the first pilot event in 2009, the Big Bang Fair has grown attendance from 6,500 to 56,000 at this year's event."
Currently, the furthest back that scientists can observe is 380,000 years after the Big Bang.
Yesterday scientists said this snapshot from a Nasa satellite orbiting one million miles above Earth conclusively proved the Big Bang Theory on the birth of life.
Bork writes that "the argument from design is now bolstered by the findings of physics concerning the Big Bang. We now know that there were a great many 'coincidences' at the outset of the universe that were essential if life was to exist." These "findings," coupled with arguments for creationism in biology, provide Bork with a ray of hope in his otherwise grim assessment of current intellectual trends.
"Big Bang Theory" co-creator Chuck Lorre recently told (https://tvline.com/2019/02/08/the-big-bang-theory-series-finale-one-hour-two-parter/) TV Line one tidbit about the Season 12 finale.