big league

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big league

n.
1. Sports A major league.
2. Informal The most prestigious level of accomplishment.

big leaguer n.

big′ league′


n.
2. Often, big leagues. the area of greatest competition, highest achievement or rewards, etc.
[1895–1900]
big′-league′, adj.
big′-lea′guer, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.big league - the most important league in any sport (especially baseball)big league - the most important league in any sport (especially baseball)
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
major-league club, major-league team - a team that plays in a major league
league, conference - an association of sports teams that organizes matches for its members
References in periodicals archive ?
Every pitcher in the big leagues that's pitched has to pitch with it.
More than ten years ago, Marucci launched in a backyard shed with the goal of becoming the number one bat in the Big Leagues.
Playing Pro Sports is a four-volume series exploring life as an athlete in the big leagues of baseball, football, basketball, and hockey.
That he is not a traditional pull-hitting slugger was demonstrated during his first month in the big leagues; he stroked three homers to left, four to center, two to right-center, and one opposite-field shot to right.
In its report, Big Leagues Table 2012: Global Core Banking Sales Ranking, Celent has developed a scoring methodology to rank the core banking vendors on their deals during the time period between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012.
BIG LEAGUES is her debut mystery, and one can't help but suspect that the book is autobiographical ...
When Smith asked Frick why there were no African Americans in the big leagues, the baseball executive replied that there was a misunderstanding that there were no African Americans because baseball did not want them.
I'm not really a Nick Green guy, but he's played in the big leagues. And that's about the best they've got there."
Beane further believes that the bunt and the stolen base do not statistically pay off in the big leagues. Like Earl Weaver, the old Oriole manger, Beane prefers to (1) play for the big inning, (2) don't give away outs, (3) don't take unnecessary risks on the bases, (4) look for your pitch to hit, and (5) let the other pitches go, even the strikes.
Taking the drops for his bros in the 303, Lil' Angel is but one of the mile-high manglers to make the jump to the big leagues, 180 style
big leagues. Perhaps the strongest is the two-year-old relationship between the Diablos and the San Diego Padres.