native son

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Related to Bigger Thomas: Native Son

native son

n.
A man who was born or raised in a specified place: a native son of the Midwest; Atlanta's most infamous native son.

na′tive son′


n.
a person born in a particular U.S. state.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as Mary Dalton and Bigger Thomas are finally shown as more alike than different as two "crazy" young people who cannot relate to the empty world that they have inherited and try to find meaning in rebellious acts of breaking taboos of many kinds, so too are Loeb, Leopold, and Bigger tragically alike as victims of similarly dehumanizing environments.
Amazingly, so does the story of his greatest creation, Bigger Thomas, possess universality.
13) In the Autobiography and in Lee's film, Sophia extends the work of the figure of the wealthy young white woman in Richard Wright's Native Son and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, in which Bigger Thomas and the Invisible Man, respectively, consciously look the image of an obsequious darkie so that they can do anything they want.
As his subtitle indicates, Butler's Bigger Thomas is ultimately a very positive figure, not simply "the principal male character in a novel" as my outdated and gender-biased old American Heritage Dictionary defines "hero," but quite possibly as the dictionary further states, "Any man noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose.
Dalton offers Bigger Thomas a job as the family chauffeur in Native Son, he is a guilt-driven hypocrite who has profiteered off the squalid tenement in which Bigger's family lives.
But Big Boy kills a white man in self-defense rather than for reasons of racial pride, and Bigger Thomas inadvertently kills a white woman out of fear rather than from feelings of racial resentment.
Van Go Jenkins, the protagonist of the novella and parody of Bigger Thomas, is a nineteen-year-old urban, unemployed, unmarried, irresponsible, self-hating, violent black male rapist, killer, and father of four children by four different women.
Jones's personal freedom, writes Muller, is limited by his socioeconomic position: "Ironically Bob Jones, a middle-class intellectual, has been trapped by American culture as powerfully as the uneducated Bigger Thomas was in Native Son.
Here, for example, Bryant stresses the notion that Bigger Thomas can be a substitute for a modern existential hero--the violent act ripping any shroud of morality away and the modern hero inventing himself after the dramatic act.
Virtually the same pamphlets found in Herndon's bedroom (18) are planted by Bigger Thomas in his own bedroom to frame the Communists for the murder of Mary Dalton, who was named after a CP functionary to whom Wright had taken a dislike in Chicago (Fabre, Unfinished 170).
Two of the most influential fictional portrayals of African-American men, Uncle Tom and Bigger Thomas, illustrate polarized responses.
1] If Wright's Bigger Thomas was the avatar of African-American rage and despair, Handy's popular acclaim as what Newsweek called "the Beethoven of Beale Street" ("Beethoven" 46) was grounded in the story of a Southern black boy who makes good, creatively and financially, in an America fully prepared to honor his musical gifts, if not always his rights as a citizen.