metformin

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Related to Biguanides: Sulfonylureas

met·for·min

 (mĕt-fôr′mĭn)
n.
An oral hypoglycemic drug, C4H11N5, usually used in its hydrochloride form, that decreases glucose production by the liver and increases peripheral glucose uptake, used to treat type 2 diabetes.

[Probably met(hyl) + form(ic acid) + -in.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metformin

(mɛtˈfɔːmɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) a drug, C4H11N5, used to treat type 2 diabetes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metformin - an antidiabetic drug (trade name Glucophage) prescribed to treat type II diabetes
antidiabetic, antidiabetic drug - a drug used to treat diabetes mellitus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

metformin

n metformina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a drug class called biguanides, it's inexpensive, and--unlike some other options--doesn't cause weight gain.
Current drug treatment of diabetes besides insulin is oral hypoglycemic drugs including insulin sensitizers (biguanides, thiazolidinediones), insulin secretagogues (sulfonylureas, meglitinides), [alpha]-glucosidase inhibitors, incretin agonists, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4.
Birnbaum, "Biguanides suppress hepatic glucagon signalling by decreasing production of cyclic AMP," Nature, vol.
Other oral biguanides, phenformin and buformin, were introduced in subsequent years.
There are seven pharmacologic subclasses of oral antidiabetic agents: alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, meglitinides, sulfonylureas, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, and thiazolidinediones.
TYPES AND NAMES OF DIABETES MEDICATIONS* CLASS BRAND NAMES Biguanides Glucophage, Fortamet GLP-1 receptor agonists Trulicity, Tanzeum, Bydureon, Victoza DPP-IV inhibitors Januvia, Onglyza, Nesina SGLT-2 inhibitors Invokana, Farxiga, Jardiance Sulfonylureas Amaryl, Glucotrol, DiaBeta, Glynase Insulin Tresiba, Toujeo, Afrezza, Levemir, Lantus Combination drugs Janumet, Jentadueto, Kombiglyze, Tradjenta, Kazano, Oseni * This chart provides examples of some, but not all, medications used to treat diabetes.
In our ongoing research on molecules with antidiabetic activity [6, 7], we report in this manuscript the preparation of ten alicyclic and aromatic biguanides (Table 1), as well as the in vitro activation of AMPK.
Figure 5 shows "Biguanides" instances of the "Glucose-Lowering_Agents" class and Figure 6 shows an example of patient_1's instance.
One of the most studied possible molecular targets for biguanides action is their inhibitory action on respiratory chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase, NDH), first described in liver tissue [8, 22].
The global diabetes drugs and devices market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2013 to 2020) for key market segments based on the drug type (insulin derivatives - short-acting, intermediate-acting, long-acting, premixed, and rapid-acting insulin; oral anti-diabetes drugs - alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, DPP-4 inhibitors, meglitinides, SGLT-2 inhibitors, sulphonylureas, thiazolidinediones; and non-insulin injectable anti-diabetes drugs - GLP-1 analogs), device type (diabetes monitoring and diagnostic devices - analog glucose meter, continuous glucose monitoring devices, glucose test strips, lancets and lancing devices; insulin delivery devices - insulin injectors, pens, pumps, syringes, etc.), and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2016 to 2020).
Biguanides inhibits pyruvate carboxylase and dehydrogenase and causes more lactate accumulation.