binding

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bind·ing

 (bīn′dĭng)
n.
1. The action of one that binds: glue for the binding of pieces of plastic pipe.
2. Something that binds or is used as a binder.
3.
a. The manner in which the pages of a book are joined and held together: Is the binding of that book stitched or glued?
b. The material that holds the pages of a book together, especially the cover: a book with a leather binding.
4. A strip of fabric or tape sewn or attached over or along an edge for protection, reinforcement, or ornamentation.
5. Sports The fastening on a ski or board for securing the boot, often releasing automatically to prevent injury.
adj.
1. Serving to bind: a binding protein.
2. Uncomfortably tight and confining.
3. Tending to cause constipation: foods that are binding.
4. Imposing or commanding adherence to a commitment, an obligation, or a duty: binding arbitration; a binding agreement.

bind′ing·ly adv.
bind′ing·ness n.

binding

(ˈbaɪndɪŋ)
n
1. anything that binds or fastens
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the covering within which the pages of a book are bound
3. (Knitting & Sewing) the material or tape used for binding hems, etc
adj
4. imposing an obligation or duty: a binding promise.
5. causing hindrance; restrictive

bind•ing

(ˈbaɪn dɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of fastening, securing, uniting, or the like.
2. anything that binds.
3. the covering within which the leaves of a book are bound.
4. a strip of material that protects or decorates the edge of a tablecloth, rug, etc.
5. a fastening to lock a boot onto a ski.
adj.
6. able or likely to bind; restrictive.
7. having power to bind; obligatory.
[1200–50]
bind′ing•ly, adv.
bind′ing•ness, n.

binding

The fastening or securing of items to a movable platform called a pallet. See also palletized unit load.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.binding - the capacity to attract and hold somethingbinding - the capacity to attract and hold something
attractiveness, attraction - the quality of arousing interest; being attractive or something that attracts; "her personality held a strange attraction for him"
2.binding - strip sewn over or along an edge for reinforcement or decoration
stitchery, sewing - needlework on which you are working with needle and thread; "she put her sewing back in the basket"
3.binding - the act of applying a bandagebinding - the act of applying a bandage  
medical aid, medical care - professional treatment for illness or injury
4.binding - one of a pair of mechanical devices that are attached to a ski and that will grip a ski bootbinding - one of a pair of mechanical devices that are attached to a ski and that will grip a ski boot; the bindings should release in case of a fall
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
5.binding - the protective covering on the front, back, and spine of a bookbinding - the protective covering on the front, back, and spine of a book; "the book had a leather binding"
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
half binding - book binding in which the spine and part of the sides are bound in one material and the rest in another
protective cover, protective covering, protection - a covering that is intend to protect from damage or injury; "they had no protection from the fallout"; "wax provided protection for the floors"
three-quarter binding - the spine and much of the sides are a different material from the rest of the cover
Adj.1.binding - executed with proper legal authoritybinding - executed with proper legal authority; "a binding contract"
valid - well grounded in logic or truth or having legal force; "a valid inference"; "a valid argument"; "a valid contract"

binding

Translations
جِلْدَه، غِلاف
vazba
indbinding
bókband

binding

[ˈbaɪndɪŋ]
A. N
1. [of book] → encuadernación f
2. (Sew) → ribete m
3. (on skis) → ataduras fpl
B. ADJ
1. [agreement, contract, decision] → vinculante; [promise] → que hay que cumplir
to be binding on sbser obligatorio para algn
2. (Med) → que estriñe

binding

[ˈbaɪndɪŋ]
n [book] → reliure f
adj [contract] → qui constitue une obligation
to be binding on sb → lier qn, engager qn

binding

n
(of book)Einband m; (= act)Binden nt
(Sew) → Band nt
(on skis) → Bindung f
adj
agreement, promisebindend, verbindlich (on für)
(Tech) → bindend, Binde-
(Med) food etcstopfend

binding

[ˈbaɪndɪŋ]
1. n (of book) → rilegatura, legatura (Sewing) → fettuccia, bordo; (on skis) → attacco
2. adj (agreement, contract) → vincolante
to be binding on sb → essere vincolante per qn

bind

(baind) past tense, past participle bound (baund) verb
1. to tie up. The doctor bound up the patient's leg with a bandage; The robbers bound up the bank manager with rope.
2. to fasten together and put a cover on the pages of (a book). Bind this book in leather.
ˈbinding noun
the covering in which the leaves of a book are fixed. leather binding.
-bound
(as part of a word) prevented from making progress by a particular thing. The ship was fogbound.

bind·ing

n. enlace; ligazón; venda; vendaje.
References in classic literature ?
The second was littered with fragments of broken furniture, empty picture-frames of worm-eaten wood, shattered vases, boxes without covers, and books torn from their bindings.
This was constructed of light and elegant canes in a kind of open screenwork, tastefully adorned with bindings of variegated sinnate, which served to hold together its various parts.
He never read them, for he had long lost the habit of reading, but he liked to turn the pages, look at the illustrations if they were illustrated, and mend the bindings.
There were thousands there, many in beautiful bindings, glowing in soft coloring, gleaming with pale gold, for he loved to clothe his treasures in fitting garments.
He's gone through every penny he ever had, publishing rotten verses in fancy bindings.
A couple of glazed book- cases were here, containing standard works in stout gilt bindings.
As the disappearing skirts of the ladies ascended the Veneering staircase, Mortimer, following them forth from the dining-room, turned into a library of bran-new books, in bran-new bindings liberally gilded, and requested to see the messenger who had brought the paper.
All through the wheat season, she told us, Ambrosch hired his sister out like a man, and she went from farm to farm, binding sheaves or working with the threshers.
The moments glided on, while a feeling of good fellowship passed around the circle like a mystic cord, holding and binding these people together with jest and laughter.
Next day, I had the meanness to feign that I was under a binding promise to go down to Joe; but I was capable of almost any meanness towards Joe or his name.
At the dawn of that day Umslopogaas arose and clad himself in a moocha, binding the she-wolf's skin round his middle beneath the moocha.
I may also add, that it appears by some papers in my possession, that the officers or Country Keepers on the border, were accustomed to torment their prisoners by binding them to the iron bars of their chimneys, to extort confession.