binocular disparity


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binocular disparity

n
(Physiology) physiol the small differences in the positions of the parts of the images falling on each eye that results when each eye views the scene from a slightly different position; these differences make stereoscopic vision possible
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The horizontal progressive mirror, Lee said, does have some problems with binocular disparity (the slight difference between the viewpoints of a person's two eyes) and astigmatism (blurring of a viewed image due to the difference between the focusing power in the horizontal and vertical directions).
These units correspond to the virtual space constructed by observers' visual system from binocular disparity information.
Excluding binocular information by means of imposing a monocular viewing condition, thus preventing the effectiveness of binocular disparity and fusional vergence information, increased the RSME intrinsic to visual space.
detected by means of temporal changes in binocular disparity instead of inter-ocular velocity differences.
can add binocular disparity and convergence depth cues to reinforce the perception of depth.
The horizontal progressive mirror, Lee says, does have some problems with binocular disparity (the slight difference between the viewpoints of a person's two eyes) and astigmatism (blurring of a viewed image due to the difference between the focusing power in the horizontal and vertical directions).
There, images on the screen are filtered so that each eye sees a slightly different perspective - known as binocular disparity - fooling the brain into perceiving depth.
With none of the depth cues associated with binocular disparity, the brain assumes it must be viewing a distant 3D object instead of looking at a 2D image.
Two other distance cues, binocular disparity and motion perspective, are effective distance cues in action space.
This is called binocular disparity - when you alternate between closing your left and right eye, objects appear to jump back and forth.
It has already been demonstrated that the addition of binocular disparity information to other cuing methods can assist human performance in a number of tasks (Nakayama & Silverman, 1984; Sollenberger & Milgram, 1993).
When the various spatial frequency components in an image have the same binocular disparity, cooperative interactions can occur, as demonstrated by Rohaly and Wilson (1993) and by the present study.