bioaccumulate


Also found in: Medical.
Related to bioaccumulate: Biomagnify

bioaccumulate

(ˌbaɪəʊəˈkjuːmʊˌleɪt)
vb (intr)
(Biology) (of substances, esp toxins) to build up within the tissues of organisms
ˌbioacˌcumuˈlation n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
bioakkumulieren
생물농축되다
References in periodicals archive ?
Both PFOS and PFOA persist indefinitely in the environment, bioaccumulate in humans and animals over long periods of time, and biomagnify as they are consumed up the food chain.
The long life time also suggests pollutants can bioaccumulate in these unusual organisms.
Once in the food chain mercury can bioaccumulate causing adverse effects to human health.
The poisons bioaccumulate in the wildlife that prey on rodents, and they, too, become sickened or die from "rodenticide intoxication." Although second generation anticoagulants are designed to kill in one feeding, both first and second-generation anticoagulants cause bioaccumulation and death in non-target wildlife.
* Johnson's uses a patented system to create products that are biodegradable, nontoxic and don't bioaccumulate. More efficient manufacturing processes cut water usage by 20%.
Because of their persistence, POPs bioaccumulate with potential adverse impacts on human health and the environment.
These compounds--which tend to bioaccumulate in food chains and can persist for a long time in the body--are found regularly in the blood of animals and humans worldwide, and have been linked with reproductive toxicity, endocrine disruption, and immune system dysfunction.
According to Cinches, being an apex predator, sharks bioaccumulate heavy metals into their system, which is being transferred to humans.
This means that they have a high stability to chemical breakdown, bioaccumulate in the food chain and are toxic to humans and animals.
The good news, according to the University of California, Santa Cruz's Peter Weiss-Penzias, is that "on a relative scale, the levels of mercury are quite low and of no health concern." The bad news is that "it does bioaccumulate," says Weiss-Penzias, causing animals and plants in fog-shrouded areas to have 10 times as much monomethylmercury in them as those in areas without fog.