biocide

(redirected from Biocides)
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bi·o·cide

 (bī′ə-sīd′)
n.
A chemical agent, such as a pesticide, that is capable of destroying living organisms.

bi′o·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

biocide

(ˈbaɪəˌsaɪd)
n
(Biology) a chemical, such as a pesticide, capable of killing living organisms
ˌbioˈcidal adj

bi•o•cide

(ˈbaɪ əˌsaɪd)

n.
any chemical that destroys life by poisoning, esp. a pesticide, herbicide, or fungicide.
[1945–50]
bi`o•cid′al, adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Luanne Jeram, head of regulatory affairs and services North America in the Lanxess business unit Material Protection Products, expands on the future of biocides in paints and coatings.
Biocides need to be targeted so they kill the MIC-causing bacteria while minimizing damage to the environment and to equipment.
The EU Council of Ministers definitively adopted, on 10 March, a new regulation updating the rules in force for placing biocides on the market.
com)-- The global market for biocides is expected to reach USD 10,745.
But Highway 36 families contaminated with herbicides and other chemicals that can collectively be called biocides get no protection.
A EUROPEAN Union (EU) scientific committee has called for additional research to establish whether biocides are safe for consumers and if bacteria are becoming resistant.
In addition, GeoTru is easy to handle and ship because of its favourable toxicity profile compared to other biocides used for the same purpose, it is not reactive with typical down-hole chemistries and is equipment-compatible.
Studies performed have demonstrated Kathon's high efficiency compared to other biocides.
Halogen compounds will remain the largest product segment of the biocides market, accounting for more than one-third of demand in 2010, due mainly to their dominant position in both recreational and industrial water treatment.
The introductory sections explain the need for biocides in plastics and basic microbiology and describe plastic materials requiring biocides.
Surface treatments, such as dipping or spraying with biocides, need to be developed to protect construction materials during storage and transit.
notes that even applying biocides to kill organisms invading artifacts can be a bad idea.