biofact


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biofact

(ˈbaɪəʊfækt)
n
1. an item of biological information
2. an item of biographical information
References in periodicals archive ?
Either the visitor wants to know how the biofact was acquired or how much of what they are seeing was part of the living animal.
Some displays feature real biofacts, but others are facsimiles.
Parallel developments in medical approaches to mental capacity assessment, including the assessment of performance in addition to the measurement of decision-domain specific capacities through cognitive testing tools, are similarly presented as providing a more accurate account of the underlying biofact.
The New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences will also provide touch tanks, beach creature exploration modules and biofact exhibits to the ACIPBS on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.
Archaeology is the study of human activity in the past, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data that has been left behind by past human populations, which includes artifacts, architecture, biofacts, and cultural landscapes (known as the archaeological record).
Pam was also accompanied by a few species from the Discovery Centre, plus animal skins and other biofacts to help reinforce the importance of conservation.
I don't think I would have such a fun time learning about the four biomes and their animals without your biofacts," wrote Julien Piltzer from Balboa Magnet School.
Donson was teaching us with no biofacts whatsoever.