systems biology

(redirected from Biological systems)
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systems biology

n.
The branch of biology that uses computational techniques to analyze and model how the components of a biological system such as a cell or organism interact with each other to produce the characteristics and behavior of that system.
References in periodicals archive ?
My father is a wildlife biologist who taught me the importance of restoration work--one of the reasons I pursued biological systems engineering.
Synthetic biology is "the design and engineering of biologically based parts, novel devices and systems as well as the redesign of existing, natural biological systems".
This is enabled through cutting edge bioinformatics, including algorithms and tools, that drive the rational design of complex biological systems at the DNA level.
But with the appearance of living things the interactive dimension comes into play in addition to the constitutive one: insofar as biological systems actively maintain their organization, biological systems exercise agency and are in consequence autonomous in a way that chemical autopoietic systems are not.
This however does not seem to be the case in some biological systems, which display quantum properties even at ambient temperatures.
Each chapter begins with examples of social or biological systems with similar mathematical structure, then constructs a mathematical model with a focus on making the model as complex as necessary, but no more so.
Put simply, synthetic biology is the engineering of biology--where scientists and engineers design and build biological systems to perform specific functions.
Metabolomics is the study of small molecules called metabolites, found within cells and biological systems. Metabolites are produced or consumed in the chemical reactions that take place in the body to sustain life.
Utilizing advanced algorithms and silicon circuitry, two prototype neurosynaptic computing chips are said to recreate the phenomena that takes place between spiking neurons and synapses in biological systems. Such chips could be used in cognitive computers, which would learn through experiences, like the human brain, rather than simply being programmed.
Researchers at North Carolina State University in Raleigh have developed a new way to use multi-core chips, which they said will help computers more efficiently process models of biological systems.
After decades of a reductionist focus, the ability to study the interactions between the components of biological systems, and how these interactions give rise to the function and behavior of those systems, has enabled the development of systems biology.
The aim of developing "autonomous adaptive structures" is to mimic the ability of biological systems such as bone to sense the presence of damage, halt its progression, and regenerate itself.
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