biomass

(redirected from Biomatter)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

bi·o·mass

 (bī′ō-măs′)
n.
1. The total mass of living matter within a given unit of environmental area.
2. Plant or animal material, such as forestry byproducts or agricultural waste, that is used as a fuel or energy source.

biomass

(ˈbaɪəʊˌmæs)
n
1. (Environmental Science) the total number of living organisms in a given area, expressed in terms of living or dry weight per unit area
2. (Biology) vegetable matter used as a source of energy

bi•o•mass

(ˈbaɪ oʊˌmæs)

n.
1. the amount of living matter in a given habitat, expressed either as the weight of organisms per unit area or as the volume of organisms per unit volume of habitat.
2. organic matter that can be converted to fuel and is therefore regarded as a potential energy source.
[1930–35]

bi·o·mass

(bī′ō-măs′)
1. The total amount of living material in a given habitat.
2. Organic materials, such as plant matter and manure, that have not become fossilized and are used as a fuel or energy source. Biomass fuels produce less carbon dioxide than some fossil fuels, such as petroleum.
Did You Know? The matter that makes up the Earth's living organisms is called biomass. Insects alone make up an amazing amount of biomass. The biologist J.B.S. Haldane was once asked if the study of life on the Earth gave him any insights into God. Haldane replied jokingly that his research revealed that God must have "an inordinate fondness for beetles." Haldane made his comment because there are more beetle species—almost 400,000 now known—than species of any other animal. And beetles are only one kind of insect, of which there are almost one million species that are known and perhaps many millions more yet to be discovered. The number of individual insects is mind-boggling, about 10 quintillion (that's 10,000,000,000,000,000,000). So all those little critters add up. Insects together probably have more biomass than any other type of land animal. And if we added up all the weights of all the people in the world, the biomass of all the insects would be 300 times as great.

biomass

The chemical energy in growing plants, hence biomass fuels (firewood, dried dung, and biogas).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biomass - plant materials and animal waste used as fuel
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
2.biomass - the total mass of living matter in a given unit area
mass - the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field
Translations
biomassa

biomass

[ˈbaɪəʊˌmæs] Nbiomasa f
References in periodicals archive ?
Arkis' in vitro studies have shown 99% less biomatter accumulation onto CerebroFlo's catheter surfaces, which may reduce fouling.
Caption: Some minerals like these form from decaying biomatter.
Engqvist, Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement, Biomatter, 94-102 (2012).
By applying the same data's ecological footprint ratios, mankind annually extracts from the ecosystem the biomatter and minerals for 1, out of which only 10% end up as a final product, but at the same time we pollute waters, land, air and near outer space with non-degradable and/or toxic, solid or aerosol, particles and noise for 2.
Pro-Dex specializes in manufacturing safe and reliable devices to withstand environments where saline, high pH solutions and biomatter are common.
In its last phase, D2W bags turns into a material, which is absorbed in the atmosphere just as biomatter gets absorbed.
Also, Audette noted, welded products have come into favor, because "there is no place for biomatter to get in.