biopiracy

(redirected from Biopiracy and bioprospecting)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Biopiracy and bioprospecting: bioprospectors

bi·o·pi·ra·cy

 (bī′ō-pī′rə-sē)
n.
The commercial development of biological compounds or genetic sequences by a technologically advanced country or organization without obtaining consent from or providing fair compensation to the peoples or nations in whose territory the materials were discovered.

bi′o·pi′rate (bī′ō-pī′rĭt) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biopiracy

(ˈbaɪəʊˌpaɪrəsɪ)
n
(Pharmacology) the use of wild plants by international companies to develop medicines, without recompensing the countries from which they are taken
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biopiracy - biological theftbiopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
larceny, stealing, theft, thievery, thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

biopiracy

[ˌbaɪəˈpaɪərəsɪ] Nbiopiratería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, we present an overview of the legal frameworks, discuss some exemplary cases of biopiracy and bioprospecting as excellent forms of utilization of natural resources.
To demonstrate the dimension of biopiracy and bioprospecting, we mention herein a few selected examples from across five continents, which would illustrate the width and difficulty of this field and that clear-cut "black-or-white" decisions are not always easy to conclude.