biped

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Related to Bipeds: bipedally

bi·ped

 (bī′pĕd′)
n.
An animal with two feet.
adj.
Variant of bipedal.

[Latin bipēs, biped-, two-footed : bi-, two; see bi-1 + pēs, foot; see pedestrian.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biped

(ˈbaɪpɛd)
n
(Zoology) any animal with two feet
adj
(Zoology) having two feet
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bi•ped

(ˈbaɪ pɛd)
n.
1. a two-footed animal.
adj.
2. Also, bi•ped′al. having two feet.
[1640–50; < Latin biped-, s. of bipēs two-footed]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·ped

(bī′pĕd′)
An animal having two feet, such as a bird or human.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biped

an animal, as man, having two feet. — bipedal, adj.
See also: Feet and Legs
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biped - an animal with two feetbiped - an animal with two feet    
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
animal leg - the leg of an animal
Adj.1.biped - having two feetbiped - having two feet      
four-footed, quadruped, quadrupedal - having four feet
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حَيَوانٌ ذو قَدَمَيْن
dvounožec
tobenet væsen
kétlábú
tvífætla
dvikojis
divkājains dzīvnieks
dvojnožec
iki ayaklı hayvan

biped

[ˈbaɪped] Nbípedo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

biped

[ˈbaɪpɛd] nbipède m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

biped

[ˈbaɪpɛd] nbipede m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

biped

(ˈbaiped) noun
an animal with two feet (eg man).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

bi·ped

n. bípedo, animal de dos pies.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Go to the meat-market of a Saturday night and see the crowds of live bipeds staring up at the long rows of dead quadrupeds.
It's so confusing to have some of them quadrupeds and others bipeds!"
He had grown up to the tacit fiction that women on horseback were not bipeds. It came to him with a shock, this sight of her so manlike in her saddle.
The race of men was to her a race of garmented bipeds, with hands and faces and hair-covered heads.
Lest the fact of Miss Miggs calling him, on whom she stooped to cast a favourable eye, a boy, should create surprise in any breast, it may be observed that she invariably affected to regard all male bipeds under thirty as mere chits and infants; which phenomenon is not unusual in ladies of Miss Miggs's temper, and is indeed generally found to be the associate of such indomitable and savage virtue.
The distinguishing mark of the hens was a crest of lamentably scanty growth, in these latter days, but so oddly and wickedly analogous to Hepzibah's turban, that Phoebe--to the poignant distress of her conscience, but inevitably --was led to fancy a general resemblance betwixt these forlorn bipeds and her respectable relative.
Their circumspection proved to me that these birds knew what to expect from bipeds of our species, and I concluded that, if the island was not inhabited, at least human beings occasionally frequented it.
These creatures, to judge from the shrivelled remains that have fallen into human hands, were bipeds with flimsy, silicious skeletons (almost like those of the silicious sponges) and feeble musculature, standing about six feet high and having round, erect heads, and large eyes in flinty sockets.
Martin, though usually blest with a good appetite, really forgot to finish his own beef to-night--it was so pleasant to him to look on in the intervals of carving and see how the others enjoyed their supper; for were they not men who, on all the days of the year except Christmas Day and Sundays, ate their cold dinner, in a makeshift manner, under the hedgerows, and drank their beer out of wooden bottles--with relish certainly, but with their mouths towards the zenith, after a fashion more endurable to ducks than to human bipeds. Martin Poyser had some faint conception of the flavour such men must find in hot roast beef and fresh-drawn ale.
"Oh, it is well enough as the production of a human composer, sung by featherless bipeds, to quote the late Diogenes."
The term 'slave,' if defined as related, not to a master, but to a man, or a biped, or anything of that sort, is not reciprocally connected with that in relation to which it is defined, for the statement is not exact.
It is only reasonable that woman, being--have you yet realised the fact?--a biped like her brothers, should, when she takes to her brothers' recreations, dress as those recreations demand; and yet the death of Rosalind is a heavy price to pay for the lady bicyclist.