bipolar disorder

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Related to Bipolar Personality Disorder: bipolar disorder, Personality disorders

bipolar disorder

n.
A mood disorder characterized by manic or hypomanic episodes typically alternating with depressive episodes. Also called manic-depressive disorder.

bipolar disorder

,

bipolar affective disorder

or

bipolar syndrome

n
(Psychiatry) a mental health problem characterized by an alternation between extreme euphoria and deep depression

bipo′lar disor′der


n.
an affective disorder characterized by periods of mania alternating with depression, usu. interspersed with relatively long intervals of normal mood; manic-depressive illness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bipolar disorder - a mental disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depressionbipolar disorder - a mental disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depression
affective disorder, emotional disorder, emotional disturbance, major affective disorder - any mental disorder not caused by detectable organic abnormalities of the brain and in which a major disturbance of emotions is predominant
cyclic disorder, cyclothymia, cyclothymic disorder - a mild bipolar disorder that persists over a long time
References in periodicals archive ?
Terms such as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Anxiety and Depression, Bipolar Personality Disorder (BPD) and Narcissistic Personality Disorder have snuck into our lives.
Healing Happens brings you insight and inspiration from health and healing experts who cured themselves and others despite dire medical prognoses from over twenty illnesses ranging from cancer, diabetes, and multiple sclerosis to Hashimoto's, hypothyroidism, bipolar personality disorder, stroke, musculoskeletal pain, blindness, ADHD, obesity, fibromyalgia, hepatitis C, cerebral palsy, and anxiety.
An involuntarily committed man who suffered from bipolar personality disorder was unreasonably denied necessary therapy, unlawfully restrained due to a nurse's false report that he'd attacked her, and subjected to multiple severe assaults by another patient who acted at the behest of the plaintiff's own doctor.<br />Background<br />Plaintiff Brian Farabee brings this action pursuant to 42 U.S.C.