bird strike

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bird strike

n
(Aeronautics) a collision of an aircraft with a bird
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In addition to enhancing the margin of safety by increasing aircraft recognition, the Pulselite[R] System has been proven to significantly reduce bird strikes.
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and provincial governments should take appropriate steps to prevent bird strikes incidents.Aviation experts said such frequent cases of bird strikes are the result of increased population around the airports and growing environment pollution.
He said the system would be able to reduce engine-associated damages from the current 33 per cent to five per cent.While Wajir Airport is also riddled with the challenge of bird strikes due to the nearby slaughterhouse and poor sanitary conditions, installation of the gadget has not been prioritised due to low traffic and financial constraints.
He said Kenya's airports had an average of 4.1 bird strikes per every 10,000 flights from July 2018 to April 2019.
Bird strikes cost the aviation industry millions of dollars every year.
Their report adds: "The Bell 429 windscreen is not designed to withstand bird strikes and the design certification requirements do not require it to do so.
Mr Herraghty trots out the same old nonsense about wind turbines and bird strikes. The consensus among scientific studies is that a turbine will suffer a bird strike a handful of times per year.
A strategically placed bird house--either within three feet of a window or over 30 feet away--will help avoid bird strikes.
RAWALPINDI -- The four Pakistan International Airline (PIA) aircraft grounded last week due to bird strikes have started their flights on international and domestic routes after repair work was done.
The recent growth in global bird populations, combined with the increase in global air traffic, has caused bird strikes to become a primary safety threat and financial burden to rotorcraft operators.
Even with the best near real-time information, or perhaps with cockpit displays, some bird strikes will remain unavoidable.
Planes are more vulnerable to bird strikes during takeoffs, ascent and landing due to the existence of a greater number of birds in flight at this lower level, approximately 2,000 feet, she added.