birder

(redirected from Birders)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to Birders: Twitcher, bird watching

bird·er

 (bûr′dər)
n.
1. A bird watcher.
2.
a. A breeder of birds.
b. A hunter of birds.

birder

(ˈbɜːd)
n
(Other Non-sporting Hobbies) another name for a bird-watcher

bird•er

(ˈbɜr dər)

n.
1. a bird-watcher.
2. a person who raises birds.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.birder - a person who identifies and studies birds in their natural habitatsbirder - a person who identifies and studies birds in their natural habitats
amateur - someone who pursues a study or sport as a pastime
Translations

birder

nVogelbeobachter(in) m(f)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Devoted birders can see up to 35 kinds of warblers during spring in our region.
Unless the reader is a birder, the most interesting part of this story is the civic activism in which Laurel and fellow birders involve themselves.
Birders have travelled in from far and wide to get a sight of the bird and so the hide at Saltholme has been hectic at times.
Recently, members of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines went to two unlikely locations to go birding - armed with only a pair of binoculars, a book with pictures and illustrations of birds, and a genuine interest in birds and the wildlife, the birders visited the Pagbilao Power Station in Quezon and the Sual Power Station in Pangasinan.
Jacobs divides birders into a threefold classification: vernacular birders, ornithologists and recreational birders, depending on the kind of facts each group produces.
It flew out to sea but was refound at nearby Traeth Lligwy, enabling local birders to catch up with this mega sighting.
Summary: Bird documentaries have also been minting new birders, and making environmentalists out of them
Birders of all experience levels are invited to join the Coast Fork Birders for a bird walk through both paved and unpaved spaces.
Where other books provide regional details, few can claim that the author has personally seen almost all of them, and few can combine the scientific and natural history details of them with a wider discussion of each bird's history and habits, all provided in a chatty voice accessible to non-scientists and lay birders. Lovely photos by Kathy Adams Clark compliment entries packed with bird information, making this a winning field guide for newcomers and advanced Texas birders alike.
There's even a website, Ebird, where birders can post pictures and stories.
Once Ross posted his pictures online, it sparked an internet surge from birders across the country.
However, it may be too soon to press the climate change alarm, caution some birders adding that any change in migratory behaviour could have resulted from the disturbed habitats in the city.