oral contraceptive

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oral contraceptive

n.
Any of various pills containing estrogen and a progestin, or a progestin alone, that inhibit ovulation and are used to prevent conception. Also called birth control pill.

o′ral contracep′tive


n.
[1955–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oral contraceptive - a contraceptive in the form of a pill containing estrogen and progestin to inhibit ovulation and so prevent conceptionoral contraceptive - a contraceptive in the form of a pill containing estrogen and progestin to inhibit ovulation and so prevent conception
Demulen - trade name for an oral contraceptive
Enovid - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing mestranol and norethynodrel
Loestrin - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing estradiol and norethindrone
Lo/Ovral - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing estradiol and norgestrel
Micronor - trade name for and oral contraceptive containing the progestin compound norethindrone
Modicon - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing estradiol and norethindrone
Norinyl - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing norethindrone and mestranol
Norlestrin - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing estradiol and norethindrone
Nor-Q-D - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing norethindrone
Ovocon - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing estradiol and norethindrone
Ovral - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing estradiol and norgestrel
Ovrette - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing norgestrel
Ovulen - trade name for an oral contraceptive containing mestranol and a progestin compound
Lipo-Lutin, progesterone - a steroid hormone (trade name Lipo-Lutin) produced in the ovary; prepares and maintains the uterus for pregnancy
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to the widespread distribution of the commercial campaign described above, Health Canada had issued two warnings informing women and their doctors that Diane-35 held a risk of causing blood clots four times higher than the risk associated with other birth control pills. A number of women's groups collaborated to register a complaint with Health Canada about the nature of the advertisements that were shown in movie theatres, on television, on billboards and in public washrooms.
Birth control pills are synthetic forms of the hormones progesterone and estrogen taken by women to prevent pregnancy.
Thousands of lawsuits contend that the birth control pills increase women's risk of developing blood clots, strokes and heart attacks.
Question: What is the ruling concerning use of birth control pills? I hear that they have no effect on the woman's menses cycle, but does the Sharee'ah (Islamic Legislation) permit its usage?
Most birth control pills contain progestin and estrogen.
Birth control pills are another option for controlling painful periods.
The woman returned 10 months later, still complaining of abnormal uterine bleeding, but she refused surgical options; the physician prescribed birth control pills. She returned for a routine exam a year later, when her BP was again elevated.
NEW YORK -- Some in the feminine hygiene arena say the increasing use of birth control pills that limit a woman to having only four periods a year could cut into their business.
Sales for birth control pills in Switzerland are booming - but not for traditional pills.
According to the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Population Information Program, more than 18 million US women rely on birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, as their birth control method.
A majority of 18-55-year-old women who visited an emergency department were at risk o f pregnancy, and only a quarter of these patients were currently using birth control pills, according to a recent study at an urban hospital in Rhode Island.
Tracking Washington: Pointing to studies showing that pregnancy rates for some newer, lower-dose birth control pills appear higher than with an older generation of drugs, the FDA said it is reviewing its standards for the widely used products.