congenital disorder

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Related to Birth defects: anencephaly, Down syndrome, spina bifida
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Noun1.congenital disorder - a defect that is present at birthcongenital disorder - a defect that is present at birth  
ablepharia - a congenital absence of eyelids (partial or complete)
albinism - the congenital absence of pigmentation in the eyes and skin and hair
anencephalia, anencephaly - a defect in brain development resulting in small or missing brain hemispheres
ametria - congenital absence of the uterus
color blindness, color vision deficiency, colour blindness, colour vision deficiency - genetic inability to distinguish differences in hue
epispadias - a congenital abnormality in males in which the urethra is on the upper surface of the penis
clinocephalism, clinocephaly - a congenital defect in which the top of the head is depressed (concave instead of convex)
clinodactyly - a congenital defect in which one or more toes or fingers are abnormally positioned
macroglossia - a congenital disorder characterized by an abnormally large tongue; often seen in cases of Down's syndrome
Down syndrome, Down's syndrome, mongolianism, mongolism, trisomy 21 - a congenital disorder caused by having an extra 21st chromosome; results in a flat face and short stature and mental retardation
acrocephaly, oxycephaly - a congenital abnormality of the skull; the top of the skull assumes a cone shape
cheiloschisis, cleft lip, harelip - a congenital cleft in the middle of the upper lip
cleft palate - a congenital fissure of the hard palate
defect - an imperfection in a bodily system; "visual defects"; "this device permits detection of defects in the lungs"
amelia - congenital absence of an arm or leg
meromelia - congenital absence of part of an arm or leg
encephalocele - protrusion of brain tissue through a congenital fissure in the skull
meningocele - a congenital anomaly of the central nervous system in which a sac protruding from the brain or the spinal meninges contains cerebrospinal fluid (but no nerve tissue)
myelomeningocele - a congenital defect of the central nervous system in which a sac containing part of the spinal cord and its meninges protrude through a gap in the vertebral column; frequently accompanied by hydrocephalus and mental retardation
plagiocephaly - congenital malformation of the skull in which the main axis of the skull is oblique
polysomy - congenital defect of having one or more extra chromosomes in somatic cells
hermaphrodism, hermaphroditism - congenital condition in which external genitalia and internal sex organs have both male and female characteristics
pseudohermaphroditism - congenital condition in which a person has external genitalia of one sex and internal sex organs of the other sex
scaphocephaly - congenital malformation of the skull which is long and narrow; frequently accompanied by mental retardation
congenital heart defect - a birth defect involving the heart
rachischisis, schistorrhachis, spina bifida - a not uncommon congenital defect in which a vertebra is malformed; unless several vertebrae are affected or there is myelomeningocele there are few symptoms; can be diagnosed by amniocentesis
spinocerebellar disorder - any of several congenital disorders marked by degeneration of the cerebellum and spinal cord resulting in spasticity and ataxia
hyperdactyly, polydactyly - birth defect characterized by the presence of more than the normal number of fingers or toes
syndactylism, syndactyly - birth defect in which there is partial or total webbing connecting two or more fingers or toes
ankyloglossia, tongue tie - a congenital anomaly in which the mucous membrane under the tongue is too short limiting the mobility of the tongue
anomalousness, anomaly - deviation from the normal or common order or form or rule
References in periodicals archive ?
Rick Snyder has proclaimed January as Birth Defects Awareness Month in Michigan, and MDHHS is joining with the National Birth Defects Prevention Network, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the March of Dimes, the Teratology Society and MothertoBaby to raise awareness of birth defects and how they can be prevented.
Before B3 was introduced into the mother's diet, embryos were either lost through miscarriage or the offspring were born with a range of severe birth defects.
Sally Dunwoodie "It's also not yet known what dose of vitamin B3 will prevent miscarriage and birth defects.
women with Zika infection had a fetus or baby with birth defects, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in April.
Birth defects potentially linked to cases of Zika virus in the United States have increased by a factor of nearly 20 since the virus first made its way into the country, according to new findings by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
To better understand the impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection * (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3).
Rates of microcephaly and certain other birth defects were 20 times higher in pregnancies affected by Zika compared with pregnancies in years before the virus arrived in the Americas, U.
The virus is mainly spread by mosquitoes, and no mosquito-borne virus had ever been known to cause birth defects.
However, this particular use for Zofran has not been approved by the FDA, and studies have shown that Zofran use in pregnancy may actually put unborn babies at risk for a number of severe birth defects - a risk that outweighs the anti-nausea benefits the medication may have for expectant mothers.
Methods: The birth defects monitoring data of infants during perinatal period (28 weeks of gestation to 7 days after birth) were collected from obstetrics departments of all hospitals during 2003-2012.
Speaking to Gulf Times on the sidelines of the Sidra Symposium on 'Fetal Malformation' yesterday at Four Seasons Hotel, Hijazi pointed out that birth defects are common.
Birth defects are an important public health issue because they are the leading cause of infant mortality in the United States of America (USA) causing one in every five infant deaths [1].