birth rate

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Related to Birth rates: fertility rate, Crude birth rate, Death rates

birth·rate

also birth rate  (bûrth′rāt′)
n.
The ratio of total live births to total population in a specified community or area over a specified period of time. The birthrate is often expressed as the number of live births per 1,000 of the population per year. Also called natality.

birth rate

n
(Sociology) the ratio of live births in a specified area, group, etc, to the population of that area, etc, usually expressed per 1000 population per year
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.birth rate - the ratio of live births in an area to the population of that area; expressed per 1000 population per year
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
Translations

birth rate

n(indice m or tasso di) natalità
References in classic literature ?
At once the birth rate began to rise and the death rate to fall.
There was talk of all countries putting bounties on children to increase the birth rate, but it was laughed to scorn by the arithmeticians, who pointed out that China was too far in the lead in that direction.
Destroy, as you have threatened, you United States, the ten million coolies we have forced upon your shores--why, the amount scarcely equals half of our excess birth rate for a year."
There was no combating China's amazing birth rate. If her population was a billion, and was increasing twenty millions a year, in twenty-five years it would be a billion and a half--equal to the total population of the world in
It is true, three Chinese were killed by the tubes dropping on their heads from so enormous a height; but what were three Chinese against an excess birth rate of twenty millions?
By careful selection they rear only the hardiest specimens of each species, and with almost supernatural foresight they regulate the birth rate to merely offset the loss by death.
Today, 35 developing countries (30 of them "least developed") have birth rates that are above five children per woman.
* Birth rates for women ages 35 to 39 (43.8 births per 1,000 women) and 40 to 44 (8.7 births per 1,000 women) were the highest in more than three decades.
In May 2002, a Quebec Catholic bishops' statement pointed out that the province's heightened acceptance of homosexual relations would worsen the already worrisome problem of low birth rates in Quebec (LifeSiteNews.com, Oct.
still has the highest teenage pregnancy and birth rates among industrialized nations.
This rise in the female labor participation rate helps explain both the fall in the marriage and birth rates.
Once realized, this in turn promoted a lower birth rate. Schooling for women also correlated strongly with lower birth rates because of new knowledge about options in life and potential birth limitation methods; this is a relationship first noted within the West, from one social group or region to the next, and later emerging worldwide.